Abel's book coming...

d gray

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wow, you mean he actually discloses information? :oo
 

mjp

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Don't jump to conclusions! He'll figure out a way to withhold any information that you'd really want to know. ;)

Seriously though, that's a shame. It doesn't sound anything like the "living bibliography" he said he was writing. I was looking forward to that. But "a critical study of literary magazines, underground newspapers, and small press publications"? Oh my. I get sleepy just typing that.
 

mjp

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Good question. I'd say, "Ask him what it means," but his response would probably raise more questions than it answered.

He interviewed a lot of people who knew and/or published Bukowski, and some time ago he teased a bibliography that would include quotes, information, anecdotes, etc. from the publishers. That's the impression he gave anyway.

The interviews are really secondary though. He's done more research on Bukowski's work - tracking down obscure pieces and publications - than anyone else in the world, so a comprehensive bibliography is certainly something he could produce if he was so inclined.

Maybe he is still planning to do so. I hope so, anyway. He's certainly got the data. It could be epic.
 

cirerita

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Don't jump to conclusions, indeed! The living bibliography or bio-bibliography is definitely happening. I need to see a couple of large Bukowski collections and then I hope to call it a day. It has been a long journey. Anyway, I will try to put it out next year, but I'm not holding my breath. I just learned a lot of ugly things about publishing with the King of the Underground book. I didn't want a subtitle, but...

A "living" bibliography is -to me- a good old bibliography with lots of background stories about most publications as told by their publishers. Some of those stories are awesome. Some of the publishers I talked to while putting it together have passed away since. In a sense, the biblio will bring them back to life.
 

cirerita

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I didn't have a say re. the price and many other things. All the books in that series are similarly priced. My guess is that if you really want to read it, you just have to wait a couple of months and I'm sure cheaper copies will show up in Abebooks, Amazon, etc.
 

Dora

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I know...I just wonder how long it will take to be available in scholarly libraries.

But anyway, that's great news indeed. Sorry for the grumpiness, can't help being French ;)
 

growing beard

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Abebooks, Amazon, etc.
Are you doing any signed copies? Without good historians, good poetry doesn't last long on this earth ...

Also, because I'm mean, I'm going to say that using the term underground for people who are doing much better than typical work seems backwards and slightly cliche. Better title would've been "King of the above ground" :p
 

mjp

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Hey, it's only $68 if you preorder. ;)

Review from John Martin:

"As far as scholarship is concerned, it's the best, most needed, and important book ever written and published on Hank's writing and career. I did not realize that such a crazy patchwork of rumor and inaccurate speculation constituted the current state of Bukowski 'scholarship.' Debritto corrects, or questions, much of this rumor and misinformation and builds an invaluable foundation for further academic inquiry. I think sound future Bukowski scholarship will now be possible only because this book. Debritto has done a masterful job. Now Bukowski scholarship can begin to move forward on a sound, rational basis."
- John Martin, publisher of Black Sparrow Press and Bukowski

"Now Bukowski scholarship can begin to move forward on a sound, rational basis," rather than, one can only gather, the horrible innuendo and inaccuracy of those people on the Internet! Ha.

John Martin has some nerve speaking to "accuracy."
 

PhillyDave

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Jesus, at $68 it better be the best book out there about Buk, not including his very own writing.
 

chronic

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Even though I won't be buying a copy ($68 is a couple of weeks worth of food for me these days), I hope they sell a bunch of them and I hope I get a chance to read it someday.
 

Bukfan

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cirerita

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Even though I won't be buying a copy ($68 is a couple of weeks worth of food for me these days), I hope they sell a bunch of them and I hope I get a chance to read it someday.
Don't worry chronic, I'm sure more affordable copies will turn up sooner than later...

Btw, I see Abel's into "Imagism" these days.
I was into Imagism last January, when I wrote that piece. Now I have moved on to the next new thing. Imagism was a cool period in English and American poetry. There was almost no bullshit in their poetry. Some poems by Aldington are very similar to Bukowski's. No wonder Bukowski looked up to him.

"Now Bukowski scholarship can begin to move forward on a sound, rational basis," rather than, one can only gather, the horrible innuendo and inaccuracy of those people on the Internet! Ha.
Not quite so. He's talking about what I say in the book, and in my book I only make two references to Internet in passing. For better or for worse, I deliberately avoided discussing Internet references.
 
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mjp

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Not quite so. He's talking about what I say in the book, and in my book I only make two references to Internet in passing. For better or for worse, I deliberately avoided discussing Internet references.
Which may be why he's so enthusiastic about it.

My point wasn't that he loves or hates the Internet, but rather that he isn't the poster child for accuracy in anything.
 

cirerita

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I don't know how inaccurate Martin was in things that didn't involve the posthumous collections... I do know that I put him down a couple of times in the book, and the didn't say anything at all about that. After dealing with hundreds of authors, widows, families, dealers, etc, he has probably received a barrage of criticism over the years. I think most criticism leaves him cold, tho.
 

Bukfan

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I was into Imagism last January, when I wrote that piece. Now I have moved on to the next new thing. Imagism was a cool period in English and American poetry. There was almost no bullshit in their poetry. Some poems by Aldington are very similar to Bukowski's. No wonder Bukowski looked up to him.
I see! It was a very informative introduction you wrote. I never even knew there was such a thing as Imagism, but then again I was never into poetry as such apart from Bukowski and a few others. Maybe I should have a look at Aldington, especially since Bukowski looked up to him.
 

Pogue Mahone

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I have #22/25 of this edition. Bukowski's pubic hair is delicately laid into the colophon page, anchored with a rare sample of his sperm. He did this very rarely.

This is an important piece of art as well as a priceless window into the mind of a writer who was balancing on the wall between fame and common cum stains. In addition to the little man and the retarded dog drawing, the author’s inscription includes an unedited x-ray picture of his swollen prostate.

Serious inquiries only…
 

Dora

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I was into Imagism last January, when I wrote that piece. Now I have moved on to the next new thing. Imagism was a cool period in English and American poetry. There was almost no bullshit in their poetry. Some poems by Aldington are very similar to Bukowski's. No wonder Bukowski looked up to him.
Could you give the reference where Bukowski mentions those imagists, or anything that proves he looked up to them? So far I haven't found anything in the published letters :((
I see! It was a very informative introduction you wrote. I never even knew there was such a thing as Imagism, but then again I was never into poetry as such apart from Bukowski and a few others. Maybe I should have a look at Aldington, especially since Bukowski looked up to him.
FYI the Imagist manifesto was(quote):
"1. To use the language of common speech, but to employ the exact word, not the nearly-exact, nor the merely decorative word.
2. We believe that the individuality of a poet may often be better expressed in free verse than in conventional forms. In poetry, a new cadence means a new idea.
3. Absolute freedom in the choice of subject.
4. To present an image. We are not a school of painters, but we believe that poetry should render particulars exactly and not deal in
vague generalities, however magnificent and sonorous. It is for this reason that we oppose the cosmic poet, who seems to us to shirk the real difficulties of his art.
5. To produce a poetry that is hard and clear, never blurred nor indefinite.
6. Finally, most of us believe that concentration is of the very essence of poetry."

Except maybe for number 4, I was struck by how those principles were similar to Bukowski's. But how to prove that he was actually influenced by this movement(that it is not mere coïncidence) is another matter.
 

cirerita

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Dora,

B. not only looked up to Aldington -I think to recall he praises him in a few poems and in an early story- but also to the early Pound and H.D. -B. even corresponded with her.
If you need factual proof, read "Bukowski's Imagist Roots," by Jimmie Cain.
 
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