Do we enjoy reading about suffering? (1 Viewer)

Recently I picked up Dostoevsky's "Notes from the underground" and I felt for it right off the bat (it starts with "I am ill"). Thinking about it, all my favorites start this sort of opening. I can hardly bring myself to read a story where things go well in the beginning. Wouldn't it be boring?

The first Bukowski's words that I read was the novel Women. Honestly I think the reason it interested me was the opening line. "I was 50 years old and hadn't been to bed with a women for four years. I had no women friends".

am I ill? or you too agree with me on this?
 
A short list of my favorite writers would likely fall in line with your premise, but it doesn't have to be that way, I suppose it just is.

Buk, Dostoevsky, Camus, Kafka, Fante.
 

hoochmonkey9

Art should be its own hammer.
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well, I think we like to read about how people handle suffering. to see if we can go on: 'if he managed to overcome it, maybe I can also.'

but, yes, I like books that start with a little bile. and end in bile. but I'm a little odd. luckily, I'm not alone in my oddness, so I can go on. ;)
 
Buk, Dostoevsky, Camus, Kafka, Fante.

Nice list Purple! While our CD racks are different, I'm sure, it looks like our book shelves have something in common (other than science books--although, I do own a four volume set of, The World of Mathematics, which is pretty cool.) :cool:

well, I think we like to read about how people handle suffering. to see if we can go on

For me, it doesn't necessarily have to have suffering--just real life issues. The espionage thrillers and books about magical wizards tend to come up short in that department.
 
Buk, Dostoevsky, Camus, Kafka, Fante.

Pretty close to my list. I would drop Fante and add Celine though. Fante is a bit sweet for my taste. Unnecessary sweet. Celine and Buk's humor is the best. To me their lack of sensitivity is invigorating. Or sometimes the situation is so fucked up that it gets really laughable. I guess that's the fun part of the suffering. Well at least for the reader :)
 
I love Buk,HST,Camus and Fante
I fell in love with Dostoevsky when we read the first half of note from the underground in my uni(Philosophy existentalism and all that shit)
then i read the rest and found him annoying and dull
With Celine hes ok in short doses i liked journey but i dont want to read anythign eles by him.
some others go on about it to much buk seems to have the right amount I never get sick of reading him.
 
I do...all art comes from pain..John Lennon said something to the effect...

e.g Buk knew the power of a fucking toothache..which I'm personally currently enduring..the man knew how to suffer and his writing reflected that and connected with chumps like me who need to know there are others feeling the same pain.
 
[...] am I ill? or you too agree with me on this?

neither/nor, and 'sic et non', and both of that, babe.
You Are ill, but we All Are and thus we Do "agree with you on this".

Just don't worry about it.


Dos is anything but dull.

I tried to read him in the early 90's/my early 20s (due to the recommendations of Buk, Kinski and Trakl), but didn't get along with him. Tried several pieces - to no success.
Then - One night in 1991 - I've read 'Dream of a ridiculous person' - and THAT Was It! What a wonderful piece of literature and pain! I even was so fond of that, I immediately made an appointment to read it in public (for free) in a Café-house.




I do own a four volume set of, The World of Mathematics, which is pretty cool.
True?
I've been searching for a mathematician, who knows a little about field-theory (Einstein's aim). Because I've had an idea about current Superstring-/M-Theory that might lead to some interesting point, but don't have the mathematical skills to do it.
 
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True?
I've been searching for a mathematician, who knows a little about field-theory (Einstein's aim). Because I've had an idea about current Superstring-/M-Theory that might lead to some interesting point, but don't have the mathematical skills to do it.
It's true. I own them, but don't ask me what they're about--they're way beyond my grasp. I keep them around though in case I ever take a hit to the head and then suddenly find myself able to understand the stuff. :D
 

nervas

more crickets than friends
I don't know, not when it comes to reading per say. Though I do highly enjoy Buk's writing while suffering and Fante's.

But I would say I listen to too much music that seems to be about suffering. Just pick up any Bright Eyes LP, that's what's on my stereo most of the time.
 

Lolita Twist

Rose-hustler
I enjoy reading about suffering, yes. But in my opinion, Buk takes it to a funny place. And that is truly the best. For me, in literature.

I think it's like people... people generally like hearing about themselves. Some are just more blatant about it. I think the majority of people who are drawn to such literature have endured sufferings of their own, and enjoy reading about others'. Especially if it makes one laugh. Maybe you're life isn't so horrible after all. That sort of thing.
 
I think I often like reading something that strikes me as having an authentic voice. I also like 'stripped down' emotions rather than ones that are 'dressed up' because (to me anyway) it feels like you're getting closer to something that is the truth.
 

Ambreen

Sordide Sentimental
I don't consider Buk's work as dealing with suffering strictly speaking. Ok, most of it was inspired by his own harsh living but he put up with this latter, didn't complain, turned it into a way of life, and what a fascinating way of life ! When I want to read about suffering, it doesn't occur to me to think to Buk.
I fell in love with Dostoevsky when we read the first half of note from the underground in my uni(Philosophy existentalism and all that shit)
then i read the rest and found him annoying and dull
You should persevere with him, he is worth it. ;)
 
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Lolita Twist

Rose-hustler
I think that's a wonderful observation. I also agree that, no, Buk's work isn't strictly about suffering. It's 3-dimensional work, but raw emotion. Which, like Bruno Dante said, one feels like their edging upon something real. Sometimes you even get there.
 

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