Gender / Masculinity (1 Viewer)

Folks--

I am undertaking a somewhat interesting and daunting paper.... Comparing and drawing similarities / differences in the textual depictions of gender roles (particularly "Masculinity") in the works of Hemingway, Kerouac, and of course, The Buk. I have read many of his texts, and several of his poems. I have searched this forum and found that Locked in the Arms of a Crazy Life seems to be the most popular biography, and as such I have ordered it and will read it. I am wondering though if any of you may have any insights about where else to look. I know there was a literary newsletter about Buk in the 90's, is that still in press? Are there any particular poems / stanzas / novels which pop out as examples of Buk's construct of masculine behavior? Any good, prominent critics in the field of Buk who may have commented on his Gender relation issues?

Much thanks to any and all who are able to offer any help whatsoever, it is all greatly appreciated!
-Brian
 

Father Luke

Founding member
I know there was a literary newsletter about Buk in the 90's, is that still in press?

Sure / The Charles Bukowski Newsletter - no longer in print

here:

http://www.pbagalleries.com/search/...36&PHPSESSID=07c68adcd228192d3c5b6cc71d184c36


Also, if you haven't read his letters, Screams from
the balcony, et. al, I would recommend them.

Against the American Dream By Russell Harrison
may be of some use to you, and also Charles
Bukowski by Michael Gray Baughan and Gay Brewer.
 

Lolita Twist

Rose-hustler
Are there any particular poems / stanzas / novels which pop out as examples of Buk's construct of masculine behavior?
My favorite poem by Buk. Bluebird. Bluebird, to me, is about a guy (Buk) who feels a lot of pain, but he tries to mask it...

...so i pour whiskey on it,
inhale cigarette smoke...


He's trying to be masculine, but that's not really what he feels.

but i don't weep
do you?


For the poem in it's entirity, click here.
 
Father Luke's advise is on the nail as usual.
I've read 'Locked in the arms' and 'Against the American Dream'.
Russell Harrison does a decent defence of Buk's attitude to women, his treatment of his wife when they split and his treatment of women as equals .
Buk's industrial masculinity is a front, he was amazingly sensitive and fell in love all the time.
There's no parodox with Buk.... his sensitivity made him a great writer.
 
Thanks so much for all of the great pointers right off the bat!

Father Luke: Looks like those copies have been auctioned unfortunatly, I hope there's a library somewhere that will inter-library loan them to my university here in nowhereville KS!

Lolita: Where is your signature from? It's very similar to what I'm reading of Hemingway's criticisms (sounds like something Hem might say, if ever he felt like commenting directly on his definition of masculinity).
 

hank solo

Just practicin' steps and keepin' outta the fights
Moderator
Founding member
"What matters most is how well you walk through the fire" is the title of one of the posthumous collections of Bukowski's poems. It is also the last stanza from a poem called 'how is your heart?' which appeared in an earlier collection, "You Get So Alone At Times That It Just Makes Sense".
 
STONECLOUD: What do you feel about the Women's Liberation movement? Do their grievances affect you at all?

BUKOWSKI: They've got some damned good points, you know that. We have pushed them around pretty much. They have been like a secondary race. Of course there are some man-haters in there who don't really want to liberate themselves, they just want to say things against men. Leaving them out, I think the Women's Lib is a good legitimate movement. I like what they say. They've taught me things, that I do expect more. You know the old standard where a guy can go out and get laid, he comes in drunk, but if the wife goes out and does it, no good. I'm all for the Women's Lib, though I don't belong to them.
 
I remember a part of BIT, where Buk is talking about his Face, and how he saw a guy walk by with more scars than he had,

He said to the reporter that he felt jealous, and that the other man was a beautiful man; in the documentary they were just finishing the part about how Buk struggled in college because of his appearance
 
harrystuped, don't take it for exact, that's just the way I remember it. It is my very favorite part(?) of Born Into This. Bukowski is so perfect in that moment of time. He means everything he says. That piece of film made me fall in love with him. :)CRB
 
harrystuped, don't take it for exact, that's just the way I remember it.
yeah, I have a fuzzy memory and can't remember it accordingly.
By this time I should already had seen that part of the enterview, but, I lend the movie to a friend to spread the word about Buk

thanks anyway
 

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