Hemingway/Dostoyevsky.

That's a rather silly question I've got but I thought maybe you guys could help me figure it out. I was watching Lost the other night and in one episode Locke mentions the fact that Hemingway was jaleous of Dostoyevsky. I have read a lot from them both and I surely enjoy them both, but I haven't heard or read something about that, did you ? I know the Lost writers are always paying tribute to big literary names and books, so I was wondering whether this was true or not. Any thoughts ?
 

Purple Stickpin

Over 5000 posts
I don't have any solid evidence of what you mention, but it stands to reason that Hemingway should have been jealous of Dostoevsky. Dostoevsky could write. :rolleyes:

I suppose I shouldn't be so blunt. I find Hemingway to be extremely laborious reading; damn, he makes Proust seem the champion of brevity. Of course, that Dos is only availble to me in translation makes a not insignificant difference.
 
Well that's interesting. Proust does not do it at all for me, so it's a little bit hard to admit he might be easier to read than Hem. But it is true somehow they adopt that same style of taking their time to go to the point, though his changing of style after the word made him write a little bit clearer. What does make you say Dos could write ?
 

Purple Stickpin

Over 5000 posts
I was using Proust as an extreme example. I cannot read Proust.

As for Dos, I read Crime and Punishment in four days; usually a 500-600 page book is a deathtrap for me. If I make it through, it takes me weeks. I'm not sure exactly what is was; the writing style was just engaging for me (kudos go to the translator as well, I must add).
 
It's kind of the same for, I take my time when it comes to reading. Anyway I've still been searching about this Hem/Dos thing and I've come up with barely nothing so I guess it will remain a question ! :-)
 

Purple Stickpin

Over 5000 posts
and in one episode Locke mentions the fact that Hemingway was jaleous (sic) of Dostoyevsky.
Look, at this point in time, everything associated with dead writers is a mystery. So let's go to bed with that comfortably in hand. That said, there is no "fact that" Hemingway was jealous of Dostoevsky. "The fact that" isn't just one of the most poor uses of grammar, it's also not an indication that the subject at hand is a "fact."

I'm not trying to be a dick (although I may come across as such); my point is, it's very difficult to ascertain what a dead writer from the 20-50s might have thought about a writer from the 1840s-1870s +/-. It's reasonable to consider that a character on "Lost," one no doubt instructed to say provacative things, might make such a claim.

One would think that literary comparisons might be better served in a vehicle other than reality TV. Just a thought.
 

d gray

tried to do his best but could not
Founding member
Over 1000 posts
One would think that literary comparisons might be better served in a vehicle other than reality TV.
Lost is NOT a reality show! i don't even watch it and i still know that!

c'mon man, get it together. your credibility is at stake here!
 

Digney in Burnaby

donkeys live a long time
Over 1000 posts
There is a passing mention of Dostoevski in a 1935 Esquire article by Hemingway. H. is advising an aspiring writer, during what appears to be a contrived interview, on who and what to read. The Brothers Karamazov "and any two others" by the same author.
 
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