Identifying a Short Story

I need help identifying a short story that I read at least two years ago. (I'm pretty sure it's a short story, anyway.)

Here are some roughly accurate details about the story, which I hope will be sufficient for its identification: Bukowski, or perhaps just the narrator, tries to pacify some woman he is with; she is upset, perhaps even crying or yelling during some moments; her car is having problems, so he either takes the car to a garage or has the car towed; he calls her after the car arrives at the garage; he goes grocery shopping; he, probably, buys alcohol; and I think, in the end, he is able to retrieve the car from the garage. Furthermore, I think I have described the events of the story in chronological order, though I forget whether he goes grocery shopping or retrieves the car first, assuming that he does go grocery shopping and retrieve the car eventually.

Unfortunately, that's all I remember. Of Bukowski's short story collections I have read: Notes of a Dirty Old Man; Erections, Ejaculations, Exhibitions, and General Tales of Ordinary Madness; South of No North; Hot Water Music; and Tales of Ordinary Madness. Therefore, I think that the short story I hope to identify comes from one of those collections listed.

I would appreciate any guesses or suggestions that name short stories whose plots are similar to the one I have described because I think I have described a relatively obscure piece that I am not likely to have identified.

Thanks for any help.
 
Sounds for the most part similar to "Reunion" from Tales of Ordinary Madness minus the fact that the story begins with him returning home from the hospital. Since you haven't listed the above book as one you've read this might be one to revisit. Hope this helps.
 
To me it sounds like What Happened to the Loving, Laughing Girl in the Gingham Dress?, a story from Betting on the Muse.
This was the story I was looking for! Thanks!

When I wrote my original post I checked Wikipedia for the names of short story collections to mention as the possible sources for the story I wanted to be identified, but Betting on the Muse was not listed under "Short story chapbooks and collections" and so I did not mention it. (I just checked Wikipedia again, and Betting on the Muse is listed under "Poetry collections" but subtitled "Poems & Stories," which makes sense.) I could have misled, or perhaps did mislead, people by not mentioning that I have read Betting on the Muse, but, thankfully, you knew the story that I was trying to describe. Furthermore, I also said "grocery shopping" in my original post, which does not actually happen in the story, but, thankfully, you probably figured that the shopping for the plunger, paper towels, and soap in "What Happened to the Loving, Laughing Girl in the Gingham Dress?" was close enough to "grocery shopping" since it was shopping, at the very least.

Many thanks once again!

Sounds for the most part similar to "Reunion" from Tales of Ordinary Madness minus the fact that the story begins with him returning home from the hospital. Since you haven't listed the above book as one you've read this might be one to revisit. Hope this helps.
This was not the story I was looking for, but I appreciate your responding to my post to begin with. My description of the story was misleading, so your suggestion might actually match my description better than the suggestion made by zobraks. But, in the end, I was looking for "What Happened to the Loving, Laughing Girl in the Gingham Dress?" Thanks again!
 

zobraks

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thankfully, you knew the story
The instant I saw your description I knew what story it was (the one where Linda King's madness shines magnificently), I've read it the last time a couple of years ago and your description was immaculate (for me). Took me some time to find out in which collection it was though, but I was pretty much sure that's it, although you didn't mentioned Betting on the Muse as a probable source.
Many thanks once again!
You're welcome.

P.S. Don't miss another great collection of poems and stories, Septuagenarian Stew.
 
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