International Portions and Absence covers (1 Viewer)

The Germans as usual do it right: cover of Portions from a Wine-Stained Notebook due out from Fischer Verlag this November.

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Ponder

"So fuck Doubleday Doran"
RIP
Congrats, David! I believe that Fischer Verlag is a big publisher.
Good cover. Any idea why they left out "Portions from a" in the title?
 

Rekrab

Usually wrong.
Frankly, "Portions From A Wine-stained Notebook", as a title, has always felt a bit clunky to me. "Portions of..." or "Selections from..." would have been smoother. Plus, "portions" makes me think of food. "Fragments from..." I know, too late now, and who cares what I think, but that title has never worked for me. Maybe the Germans felt the same way, although after being translated, the nuances of the language would be a moot point.
 
Yes, I like the German version better. And I also like the Italian version of Absence of the Hero better: I Just Write Poetry So I Can Go To Bed With Girls

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Rekrab

Usually wrong.
This is probably an opinion that no one will share with me, but what I don't like about the German cover is the Crumb art. Sure, it's great Crumb, and fine graphic design, but when I see a Crumb drawing, all I get from it is "Crumb", and not the subject. His style is so -- what's the word? -- saturated with his consciousness, his personality, that when I see that drawing, I don't see Bukowski, I see Crumb. When I look at the drawing he did of bluesman Robert Johnson, I see Crumb, not Robert Johnson. I know if I stare at it long enough, I'll see Mr. Natural strutting by in the background, smoking a joint. That's why I've never been interested in owning those two Buk chapbooks he did the illustrations for. I'd rather read them in the collections than look at all that Crumb. Not being a troll here, just being honest (although some might say that's a fine line.) So, I'd say to publishers of Bukowski, find another artist for Chrissakes. Enough with the Crumb.
 

hoochmonkey9

Art should be its own hammer.
Moderator
Founding member
I sort of agree with you, but my problem is not with using a Crumb drawing, but using a Crumb drawing that was made for a specific part in a specific book. It would be like taking one of Rockwell Kent's illustrations from Moby Dick and slapping it on the cover of Billy Budd. that ain't right, yo.
 
fischer has also started to replace the old odd clownesque-covers - at last!
The whole line will get Crumb-covers now:

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and even more: they've put Bukowski under a new imprint: he's considered a 'CLASSIC' now!

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mjp

Founding member
Virgin did the same thing, "branding" the Bukowski books with consistent cover typeface and placement. I haven't seen any of the British or German versions of the books up close, but I would bet that the spines use a consistent design as well, so the collection has a distinct look when they are all together on your shelf. It's good marketing - collect them all! Fails as art though. To me. Though I'm sure Crumb appreciates the fact that he continues to make money from those drawings. Bukowski is turning in to his second Keep on Truckin'. ;)

There was a reggae band that did the same branding thing in the 70s and 80s, Third World, and I thought it made their records look cheap and generic. Which wasn't bad for them, I suppose, as their music was cheap and generic. But I guess I expect more in creative fields.
 
Virgin did the same thing, "branding" the Bukowski books with consistent cover typeface and placement. I haven't seen any of the British or German versions of the books up close, but I would bet that the spines use a consistent design as well, so the collection has a distinct look when they are all together on your shelf.
Yeah, they do.
They were the first Bukowski books I ever read.
 

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