sometimes music just does something to you... (1 Viewer)

jordan

lothario speedwagon
anyone want to share an experience that's happened recently when you discovered (or rediscovered) an album that just puts you in a trance? yesterday, i bought Meat Puppets II, and i can't believe how fucking good this album is. i kind of hate myself for never buying it before, but the me of 5 years ago probably would have thought it was shit.

i'm driving down to LA tomorrow, and I can't wait to listen to this baby a few times in the car with the volume turned way up.
 
I know how they are but never really checked them out, sounds like you got a 6 hour drive ahead of you. It's great to have some tunes you want to listen to.

Some day we'll be meeting in San Fran I believe.:)
 

bospress.net

www.bospress.net
I'm trying to get a group together on Friday afternoon the 9th? I was thinking Vesuvio's or the place across the street where Father Luke, Kim & Jordan hung out after the King reading. I'm flying in the night before and planned on spending the Friday at North Beach. Saturday, Sunday and Monday, I'll be in Berkley and Albany for the poetry readings.

Bill
 

Father Luke

Founding member
Bill wants to know how to do the magic glass trick.

2436938298_20d8238823.jpg


Or not. Anyway, count me in...
 

hank solo

Just practicin' steps and keepin' outta the fights
Reaper Crew
Moderator
Founding member
Bill is clearly the Masked Magician. And can no longer be a member of the Magic Circle.
 

number6horse

okyoutwopixiesoutyougo
anyone want to share an experience that's happened recently when you discovered (or rediscovered) an album that just puts you in a trance?

Not a new discovery, but Jill Scott's Who Is Jill Scott ? is one of those albums I just can't really skip/search through, looking for only the "good" tracks. Because they are ALL good. And I know you're asking about more than just a collection of good songs - an album that really spins a mood of its own.....

For me :

Smile - Beach Boys/Brian Wilson
Stranger's Almanac - Whiskeytown
Heaven and Hell - Joe Jackson

there are others....
 

mjp

Founding member
I think this is some kind of record...a thread hijacked in the first follow-up post! Ha.

Never rediscovered anything. It always just picked up where it left off, even if I hadn't heard it in 20 years.

But hearing something new that just seems right all the way through, yeah. Bob Marley and the Wailers Natty Dread, Peter Tosh Equal Rights, Stooges Funhouse, PJ Harvey Dry (best rock album ever made, incidentally), Beth Orton Trailer Park, Regina Spektor Begin to Hope - those jump out at me now and jumped out at me the first time I heard them. There are probably a lot more I could name if it wasn't too hot to move and I could get up and walk into the next room and look at the CDs...
 

jordan

lothario speedwagon
I'm going to hijack my own thread again... mjp, please tell me you weren't too hot to snap some pictures of the chantry flats fire with your holga...
 
Sorry to be on-topic here, but when I first heard Mingus, I realized that the doublebass is the absolute shit. And I don't mean crap. I mean that hot, stinking beer shit that Buk talks about as being the essence of life. Yeah, that.
 
For me it was one song Big Electric Cat by Adrian Below/King Crimson-When people ask about best song this one always comes to mind.

I also agree Mingus love Haitian fight song
and Tosh too-even if he has one of the funniest lines in music "I eat the hamburger"
I don;t know the Meat Puppets or PJ Harvey so I will have to check them out tonight.
You know you read about people and groups for years but never go out and try them then when you do you say WTF I though I knew music.
 
I've discovered the work of Leonard Cohen, the guy is knocking me out of of my Dylan phase. I was having this discussion the other day with a mate at work, we were both wondering if everyone goes through a Dylan stage, well maybe not everyone but he's one of these artists that seems to affect a wide range of people throughout different stages of their lives, when I was a teen I hated the man, and all the folky singer songwriter crap that came with it, now I'm embracing it
 

non compos mentis

Supporting good poetry
I've been in a Dylan stage since 1964. I have most of his albums (now CDs) and am still listening to him. I really like his most recent stuff. But I'm also in a Tom Waits stage and have been since 1975. I listen to him almost every day. But I listen to lots of other stuff, too. Lost of other types of music and artists.
 

Father Luke

Founding member
The first time I heard Ragtime the music did something to me.
The first time I heard Big Band the music did something to me.
The first time I heard Thelonius Monk the music did something to me.
The First time I heard Hendrix the music did something to me.
The first time I heard Tom Waits the music did something to me.
The first time I heard Uncle Tupelo the music did something to me.
The first time I heard the Pogues the music did something to me.
The first time I heard Syd Barrett the music did something to me.
The first time I heard The Sex Pistols the music did something to me.
The first time I heard Johnny Cash the music did something to me.
The first time I heard AC/DC the music did something to me.
Chuck Berry
Doc Watson
Mazzy Star
Black Sabbath
Frank Zappa
MotorHead
Tool
Talking Heads
Chris Rea
Chet Atkins
Fats Domino
The Ink Spots
Huddy Ledbetter
Arlo Guthrie
Charlie Parker
David Bowie
Miles Davis
Pearl Jam
The Beatles
Iron Butterfly - In A Gadda Da Vida (long version)
Allman Brothers - Eat a Peach
Gerry Garcia Band - Old and in the way

Music continues to grow. And it continues to do things to
me which I cannot explain. I can only step back and let it lead the way...
 
I really couldn't get into Dylan when I was growing up, and one day in 1985 I was driving down the street in Baltimore, MD when Positively Fourth Street came on the radio. I found myself turning the volume up and wondering "why the hell didn't I like this guy before? This is brilliant!" I suppose it just takes the right moment. 23 years and a boatload of records later, I would probably have to rank Dylan as the single most important rock and roll musician ever.

I've often said that Dylan was the first punk rocker. Not because the music he played is what we refer to as punk, but because he was punk. Back in 1966 during his tour of the UK, his electric sets were met with jeering, catcalls and rhythmic clapping (a derogatory gesture in the UK). He got into verbal sparring with his audiences, and after one famous exchange in Manchester on May 17, 1966, he turns to his band, Robbie Robertson and the Hawks, as they are about to launch into Like a Rolling Stone and says "play it fuckin' loud!" What follows is a soaring, sneering, snarling and howling verbal pissing-upon of the audience that will, in my mind, go down as the best example of an artist musically telling anyone within earshot: "fuck you, this is what I'm doing."

Bootleg Series Volume 4, the "Royal Albert Hall (not)" show, if you're interested.
 

chronic

old and in the way
Back in 1966 during his tour of the UK, his electric sets were met with jeering, catcalls and rhythmic clapping (a derogatory gesture in the UK). He got into verbal sparring with his audiences, and after one famous exchange in Manchester on May 17, 1966, he turns to his band, Robbie Robertson and the Hawks, as they are about to launch into Like a Rolling Stone and says "play it fuckin' loud!" What follows is a soaring, sneering, snarling and howling verbal pissing-upon of the audience that will, in my mind, go down as the best example of an artist musically telling anyone within earshot: "fuck you, this is what I'm doing."

Bootleg Series Volume 4, the "Royal Albert Hall (not)" show, if you're interested.

This is also in the Scorcese documentary.
 

mjp

Founding member
and Tosh too-even if he has one of the funniest lines in music "I eat the hamburger"
Mystic Man - actually he sings, "I man don't / eat down the hamburger."

Perhaps not surprisingly, there are quite a few reggae songs are about what foods you should stay away from in babylon.

Mutabaruka (old school "dub poet") chanted, "Strawberry ice cream, raspberry ice cream, them ah-go bury we, ah you no see?" (meaning; the ice cream is going to kill us, don't you see that?)

so, remember kids, ice cream kills!

But save a hamburger for me.
 
Really-thats cool, I stand corrected-but to a white kid in ButtFreak Ontario it sounded odd-and to set the record straight I was one of no more then 10 white kids to see Tosh in Toronto (large Jamiacan community) a concert before Bush Doctor. I thought his best stuff was before that album. Though I could be wrong about that too.

Downloading Meat Puppets Spektor and Harvey as I write to see what the fuss was about-thanks for the leads
 

hoochmonkey9

Art should be its own hammer.
Reaper Crew
Moderator
Founding member
The first time I heard Ragtime the music did something to me.
The first time I heard Big Band the music did something to me.
The first time I heard Thelonius Monk the music did something to me.
The First time I heard Hendrix the music did something to me.
The first time I heard Tom Waits the music did something to me.
The first time I heard Uncle Tupelo the music did something to me.
The first time I heard the Pogues the music did something to me.
The first time I heard Syd Barrett the music did something to me.
The first time I heard The Sex Pistols the music did something to me.
The first time I heard Johnny Cash the music did something to me.
The first time I heard AC/DC the music did something to me.
Chuck Berry
Doc Watson
Mazzy Star
Black Sabbath
Frank Zappa
MotorHead
Tool
Talking Heads
Chris Rea
Chet Atkins
Fats Domino
The Ink Spots
Huddy Ledbetter
Arlo Guthrie
Charlie Parker
David Bowie
Miles Davis
Pearl Jam
The Beatles
Iron Butterfly - In A Gadda Da Vida (long version)
Allman Brothers - Eat a Peach
Gerry Garcia Band - Old and in the way

Music continues to grow. And it continues to do things to
me which I cannot explain. I can only step back and let it lead the way...

with music, the first time is a beautiful thing.
with me, it was the Clash and Rock the Casbah in early 1982. I was 13 about to turn 14 in October.
it made me realize that there is life beyond top 40.
the Clash made me stop and look around.
then that year, soon after, I found Never Mind the Bollocks Here's the Sex Pistols in a cut out bin at my local record store.
yes, I was too young to catch the first wave of punk, but I tried to make up for my age. I never will, but, uh, you know....whatever, nevermind (get it?)

sure you do. irony is dead.
and for that fact, so is ironing.

ok, time to go. I've been drinking. and not pretend internet drinking, I've really been drinking.....
NURSE!!!
 
For me it was the Tubes. I got into them in 1980, I had graduated high school and had moved out of the family house and into my own life full of never ending responsibilities.
I was listening to folky mellow rock, i.e. Simon and Garfunkel, James Taylor, Loggins and Messina.( I was a nerdy disconnected youth in high school. Also those were easier songs to learn the guitar to.)

Then I found the Tubes, and dived in. White Punks on Dope, Don't Touch me There, Talk to Ya Later, TV is King, Mondo Bondage etc.... I had already found the Alcohol, the pot and whatever other drugs were available. But this was like a flood gate.
So much so that I totally decided to change the entire focus of my life.
I went to a school to learn Recording Engineering and I was bound and determined to work for this band...

And I did, for many years. I became part of that family.
I still occasionally do a gig or too. They became a huge part of my life.

I will agree with Father Luke I am endlessly moved in various ways by music and am thankful for that.
But the Tubes, that was the band that had a profound impact on my life and had I never heard them, I would definitely NOT be who am today.

So there you have it.
Talk To Ya Later!
 

Gerard K H Love

Appreciate your friends
Variety is the spice of life, and Father Luke said it best, nice poem. The first time is one thing but when a good song sticks in you mind that's a little piece of heaven.
The first time I heard Creedence Clearwater's Born on the Bayou I was struck. Then the next day it played in my head and the effect was it. Although I got into Savoy Brown after that. I still love that song but it changed my direction for a time.
 
Strangegirl, that is an AWESOME story. Tell more. What did you actually DO for The Tubes?

They were one of my favorites too. Saw 'em live 3 or 4 times between '81 & '94 (I think).
One of the most inventive and rockin' bands ever. I was turned onto them with the Completion Backward album but when I found their first, I never looked back. One of the best albums of the 70's.
 

mjp

Founding member
For me it was the Tubes.
On a side note, Fee Waybill is in the greatest rock and roll movie of all time; Ladies and Gentlemen, The Fabulous Stains.

He plays the singer in a band called the Metal Corpses, who are old and washed up, touring around the Northeast U.S. in a bus with opening punk band, The Looters (Paul Simenon from the Clash, and Steve Jones and Paul Cook from the Sex Pistols, fronted by actor Ray Winstone). On a stop along the tour they pick up the newly formed Stains (made up of the very young Diane Lane and Laura Dern, and another actor) and the rest is B movie history.

It's B movie on the outside, but it really captures something very realistic about small-time, low budget rock band touring (though they traveled like princes and princesses compared to most of the bands I knew and played in - a bus? Motel rooms? We would have taken your family hostage or killed you for those things ;)). It is a classic, and in my top movie list around here somewhere.
 
Ok, here's my attempt at an on-thread comment. . .

Some music literally rips my heart out. Now THAT's being moved. One fine example is the song, "The Beautiful Creatures" by Bruce Cockburn from his album "Life Short Call Now". Go find it, listen to it. And if it don't mess with your guts, you have no heart.
 

mjp

Founding member
I've read up on that movie but it's nowhere to be found. Got a copy to make a copy of?
All I have is a DVD copy, and I can't copy that with my wonderful setup here. I had a VHS copy, but the sound was shit, so I tossed it. I probably should have kept it.

Oddly enough, there is a "making of the Fabulous Stains" short on this DVD (a documentary about a guy who wore a rainbow wig and held up religious signs at sports events way back when). I don't know why it's on there, but it's as close as you can get to the movie commercially.

Looks like you can see it all on YouTube, if you're into 3x5 inch movies. Or jump right to one of the great scenes.
 

mjp

Founding member
excellent, I thought it was just an urban myth.
Ha - seems like it, doesn't it. Bootlegs are even hard to come by. Weird. You'd think someone would have released it by now just because so many of those young actors went on to become well known.

There must be music publishing issues holding it up. When that "making of" short was put together they claimed, "Now it is being released!" - but that was a few years ago, and nothing so far. I'm not holding my breath.

Someone wake up those geeks at The Criterion Collection and get them on it. ;)

Shhhhh - keep this to yourself, but if I can ever wrangle DVD copying here at the ranch (that's a big "if") I will make copies available.* You know, for scholarly purposes. The DVD I have is a bootleg off of cable, but it's the best copy I've come across.




* Please address all copyright infringement letters to my attorneys, Moscow, Jerkin & Prague LLC, Los Angeles.
 

Black Swan

Abord the Yorikke!
My father was born in 1910, he could not sing but loved opera.
This is an opera from Bizet called "les pecheurs de perles". When I heard this song
(je crois entendre..) as a child , it made me cry. This piece changed me.
 
Strangegirl, that is an AWESOME story. Tell more. What did you actually DO for The Tubes?

They were one of my favorites too. Saw 'em live 3 or 4 times between '81 & '94 (I think).
One of the most inventive and rockin' bands ever. I was turned onto them with the Completion Backward album but when I found their first, I never looked back. One of the best albums of the 70's.

I was a women of many trades. I started out helping build their Recording Studio, then i basically learned how to be a recording engineer by working in and pretty much running the studio. Prairie is one of the greatest drummers around, a true talent, I learned how to record drums with him.
I went on a lot of local and regional tours. Up and down the west coast. I did part of one National tour, but that is a whole other story. I was Drum Roadie, Guitar and keyboard roadie, I mixed monitors and front of house. I did many things. i was always loyal, i saw alot of wackiness and tried to stay inline so to speak. I worked for them starting in early 1984. Oh man there is whole book worth of stuff. Probably much to long for this. But there is a bit of it for you.

On a side note, Fee Waybill is in the greatest rock and roll movie of all time; Ladies and Gentlemen, The Fabulous Stains.
i had never seen this before, Fee was also in Bill and Ted's Excellent Adventure, He was one of the Three Most Important People in the World.

here is another clip.

http://youtube.com/watch?v=57i0xsA7C0s&feature=related

with Fee and Vince Welnick, who was the keyboard player.
Sadly Vince is no longer around. I miss him much, he was a great guy to hang with. I had just seen him in 2005 at the Tubes Reunion Show at the Rio in Santa Cruz.
 

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