ArtCrimes Issue #11, April 1991

nado

Over 100 posts
#7
There is one more poem in this mag called "upon reading an interview with a bestselling novelist in the metropolitan daily".

The database says that poem is in Sifting Through the Madness... and in Pleasures of the Damned. I do not own either of those to confirm that it is the same poem, but I cannot imagine 2 different poems with that name, though it may have been edited somewhere along the way.
 

mjp

Moderator
Founding member
Over 5000 posts
#10
There is one more poem in this mag called "upon reading an interview with a bestselling novelist in the metropolitan daily" [...] may have been edited somewhere along the way.
I would bet this month's paycheck it has been "edited," so if you have a scan, feel free to post it.
 

Erik

If u don't know the poetry u don't know Bukowski
Founding member
Over 1000 posts
#11
goodbye (very different than the poem with the same name in War All the Time)
I like myself living or dead, I am the best thing I have ever met...
:D
And there's that word "mewking" again. We discussed it once before. Found it in Shakespeare if I remember correctly...

Many thanks!
 

David

Over 500 posts
#18
It's interesting because it's one of those "fancy" words that Buk throws in sometimes. I wonder if he "knew" this word or looked it up in the dictionary while he was writing? I just looked it up myself and it is an insect which makes stuff you can make dye out of....I suppose he's making fun of people who just follow the crowd like insects....Also, all his work is full of insect imagery: ants, cockroaches, flies, etc. Obviously from living in all those dives, but also because he descends all the way to the bottom of the evolutionary ladder and hangs out with the insects--like Gregor Samsa in "The Metamorphosis" He read and liked Kafka...
 

cirerita

Founding member
Over 1000 posts
#19
I think he used the dictionary quite a lot. There are a few poems and even prose pieces (the Nomad manifesto) where it's clear he was using the dictionary.
As to "cochineals," they were pretty popular among kids in the Canary Islands 25-30 years ago. You could find them in clusters in the fleashy leafs of some cactii. If you collected a bucketful, they would pay you big money as they were used to produce some sort of natural, expensive dye.
 

Erik

If u don't know the poetry u don't know Bukowski
Founding member
Over 1000 posts
#20
I guess it a reference to the type of people who are "dead in life" that he often refers to - their blood dry in their veins- no juices flowing any more. The following definition would surely have tickled Buk's imagination:
Cochineal: a red dye prepared from the dried bodies of the females of the cochineal insect,
"Prepared from the dried bodies of females" ...:hmh:
Still, the word kind of stands out, as the text gives the impression of being written in "one take", so to say, with no time for looking up words in dictionaries...

Aha! Maybe he was reading Emily Dickinson.
More here.
 
#23
'change over' was collected as 'crazy as a fox'
in the night torn mad with footsteps.
not as many edits as usually, maybe except
at the ending.
 

zobraks

Moderator
Over 1000 posts
#28
I haven't found the word singling in any of the poetry collections I have in PDF format.
It could be in The Flash of Lightning Behind the Mountain*, Slouching Toward Nirvana, Come On In! or The Continual Condition though.

*less probably, I'm reading it right now and I'm very near the end of the book