Bukowski, directed by James Franco

Bukfan

"The law is wrong; I am right"
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#62
I fear the worst. I´m afraid both Barfly and Factotum will stand out as pure masterpieces next to this one, but I guess we´ll find out soon enough.
 
#63
If you are looking for some sort of "newly-fantastic" form of Bukowski, I think you need to re-prioritize. I've never found a medium that trumps Bukowski's words. For some reason, many people keep on trying. It boggles my mind why the masses cannot be satisfied by his words. Maybe it's because people can't read? Maybe it's because people who can read need to be spoon-fed? Seriously; what is the problem here? He wrote books. The books are, by and large, fantastic. What am I missing?
 

Black Swan

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#64
It will be very difficult to look at all these hollywood actors with impeccable dentition, trying to portray a european family, in 1925. I can only imagine the worst scenario.
 
#65
Are you suggesting that Steve Buscemi would be a better casting? Actually, he's an excellent actor and probably would be. He seems like someone who could play someone named Baldy Lacrosse.
 

Black Swan

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#66
Yes, yes! I just looked him up because I'm not good at remembering names. Yes, great features and good actor. I could even see him as a Hank, but now I forget the tone of his tone of voice.
 

mjp

So much been said and so little been done
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#67
I could even see him as a Hank, but now I forget the tone of his tone of voice.
That brings up a (possibly) interesting point. Did the Bukowski drawl that we know from his later life even exist in the young Bukowski, or was it the result of his near-death hospital episode?

A lot of unusual things happen to people when they come very close to death or have traumatic brain injuries (which a massive loss of blood could cause).

It's food for thought, mobsters.
 

Skygazer

And in the end...
Over 500 posts
#68
... Did the Bukowski drawl that we know from his later life even exist in the young Bukowski, or was it the result of his near-death hospital episode?
A lot of unusual things happen to people when they come very close to death or have traumatic brain injuries (which a massive loss of blood could cause).
Can't at the minute remember where I read it, but Bukowski certainly states that the slurred speech was the direct result of his massive Upper G.I bleed, that would lead to profound hypotension (low blood pressure) causing potential hypoxic brain damage (low supply of oxygen).
So until, blood supply and pressure are restored through transfusion or other fluids then yes, brain injury is a risk.
 

Skygazer

And in the end...
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#70
Different body part skiroom... But I am the owner of a very embarrassing but funny story from my student days, that I would never, ever repeat in polite company.
 

Black Swan

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#71
Yes, yes! I just looked him up because I'm not good at remembering names. Yes, great features and good actor. I could even see him as a Hank, but now I forget the tone of his tone of voice.
I didn't mean to say the tone of the tone of the tone of the tone...
Only the tone of his voice. :))
 

Skygazer

And in the end...
Over 500 posts
#72
Looked for the direct quote from Bukowski about his speech being affected after the bleed, couldn't find it, will probably find it in 3 months.
But instead came across a reference to his slow speech in Howard Sounes: Locked in the Arms of a Crazy Life Chapter 1 Twisted Childhood:

"It was one of the reasons Bukowski came to talk so slowly – he learned to think before speaking in case he upset his father."
 

mjp

So much been said and so little been done
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#73
Sounes did two very good Bukowski books, but if you take every word as gospel you'll find yourself being lead down more than a few garden paths. As the kids say.
 

Skygazer

And in the end...
Over 500 posts
#74
I know what you're saying but reading that chapter again, it did sound plausible, I could imagine him as a small child being so intimidated by his father, that perhaps learning to think first and slow his speech down to prevent himself getting into trouble would help, although it didn't stop the beatings, unfortunately.

Sounes does say it was one of the reasons, not the reason, so perhaps this and the possible damage done after the bleed are the main reasons.

AS well as Bukowski saying that the event altered his speech (which is the most important thing) wasn't there anyone else that biographers could contact, who also knew him before the event to verify it?
 
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mjp

So much been said and so little been done
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#75
Remember that Sounes never met Bukowski, never interviewed him, so anything he says about his childhood is second hand at best, and more often gleaned from Bukowski's own writing. Something we all have access to. Sounes himself has no special insight into Bukowski's life beyond what he got from interviewing a lot of people and doing extensive research (so again, second hand at best).

That research and those interviews made for a couple of good books. But that's all it did. It did not give him a direct view into the 10 year old Bukowski's psyche. Anything he says about how Bukowski felt or acted as a boy (that Bukowski himself hasn't said or written) is speculation and fantasy.

There's nothing wrong with speculation and fantasy. We do plenty of that here. But I just want to reiterate that, "Because Sounes said so," doesn't necessarily mean it is so. Especially when he's talking about relatively undocumented parts of Bukowski's life.
 

Skygazer

And in the end...
Over 500 posts
#77
Well, you're certainly not in that territory here.
Or this company either then :), just a little decorum goes a long way... sometimes.

That research and those interviews made for a couple of good books. But that's all it did. It did not give him a direct view into the 10 year old Bukowski's psyche. Anything he says about how Bukowski felt or acted as a boy (that Bukowski himself hasn't said or written) is speculation and fantasy.
Agree with that, I'm sure the film makers will use a variety of sources ( I would hope) in the making of the film. It will be interesting to see what they do with his voice, it such a distinctive part of him, but what it was like pre 1954 who knows? Presumably the film will end with Pearl Harbour?

I also agree with Purple Stickpin, I'm really not that keen to see it, or any other bio-pic, I'm just not that into them.
 
#79
Are you suggesting that Steve Buscemi would be a better casting? Actually, he's an excellent actor and probably would be. He seems like someone who could play someone named Baldy Lacrosse.
I always thought Buscemi would've made a great Dirk Diggler. So maybe cast him as Pete Mangalore?

It'd be pretty cool to get everybody's take on their ideal cast. I remember reading that PKD wanted Gregory Peck as "Deckard" and Grace Slick as "Rachael" if they would've made Blade Runner in the early 70s.
 

bospress.net

www.bospress.net
Over 5000 posts
#81
Well, if Franco used full dialogues that were in the original script from this other fellow, he could be in a bit of trouble. Otherwise, Franco seems to be free to make a biopic on Bukowski using another source. If this other guy owns the rights to adapt the novel HAM ON RYE, he is still free to do that. Franco is using another source for his book, NOT the novel.
 

Skygazer

And in the end...
Over 500 posts
#82
It's amazing really, given the litigious nature of the entertainment industry, you would have thought that Mr Franco would have avoided using references to adapting Ham on Rye (publicly)and instead, emphasized that he was doing a biopic - which he is now saying of course. Depends I suppose on what he has lifted from the book, dialogue wise.Would it not be difficult to sue over generic, factual events?
No doubt the lawyers are busy.
 
#83
In the last few weeks, Humphris finished a script based on "Ham on Rye" by the late Los Angeles writer Charles Bukowski. Right now, he is casting it and closing the contract - it is to be produced by Amblin Entertainment, a branch of Chesterfield Films.
I was curious how this guy obtained film rights to Ham on Rye. A quick search and I found the above quote from a 1995 article.
 

mjp

So much been said and so little been done
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#84
Film rights are limited. You buy them for X number of years (typically not many), then you lose them and someone else can pick them up. To add a layer confusion, if I own the rights to a work I can sell them to you (for the period that I bought). I imagine the rights to most of Bukowski's novels have been sold multiple times.
 

Danny Mac

Over 100 posts
#87
What is the latest news on this movie? I don't go out to the movies much at all but I am looking forward to seeing a movie in a theater that is about Buk. Who's got the latest news out there?
 

mjp

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#89
A recent article claimed that he neglected to secure the rights to the story, which is generally frowned upon. He says it isn't Ham on Rye, but rather an original work about the young Bukowski.

Though I'm not sure how you write an original work about the young Bukowski without Ham on Rye...
 

bospress.net

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#90
Say what you will about Franco, but he really is into writers. I recently saw him in As I Lay Dying, and also a biopic about Hart Crane The Broken Tower (he wrote and directed them also). Faulkner's The Sound And the Fury is set to come out soon (starred and directed), As well as playing Ginsberg in Howl. Plus Bukowski, of course.
 
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