For The Foxes, The Defamers, The Tap Dancers, And The Dreamers Of Ballet

mjp

So much been said and so little been done
Moderator
Founding member
Over 5000 posts
#1
Oh my.

Well, here we see drinking replaced with something else (again), along with the typical old cut and gut.

Can someone explain how, by any stretch of the imagination, THE BUTCHER got "satisfied" out of that poem, and decided to start it off that way? If it isn't the opposite of satisfied, then I guess I'm just out of my mind.
 
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Hosh

hoshomccreesh.com
Over 1000 posts
#2
Most telling for me:

beware those
who take their
Instructions from some
Ultimate Being.


(implying not everyone does)

and beware those who
only take
instructions from their
God.


("their God," meaning all apparently have a "God")

Not only has Buk's "some Ultimate Being" somehow become "God" with a capital "G", the original version tells the reader to be wary of the religious; the later version implies that all are religious--and to, instead, be wary of those who are intolerant...either of other people's gods, or, at very least, intolerant of taking instructions from anyone/anything but "their God."

That religion is made a constant when the original version didn't intend that is a significant change...and might just be a subtle semantic trick.

We gotta be real careful with all these silly words and what they end up meaning when rammed together carelessly...
 

Bukfan

"The law is wrong; I am right"
Over 5000 posts
#3
("their God," meaning all apparently have a "God")
It could also mean the writer does'nt have a God himself, because he does'nt write, "our God", but, "Their God". Or maybe I'm misreading it?
Funny, how, "I'm a man pouring a drink...", becomes, "I'm a man eating a meal...". Maybe the unknown editor was a teetotaler. :wb:
 
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David

Over 500 posts
#4
Thank Ultimate Being for Buk.net...Yesterday I was teaching a class on the Beats and one of my students told the class about a Bukowski poem she loves and began reciting "for the foxes." I just looked it up here and found the manuscript and commentary. I'll have to let her know that the version she was reading from--from the night torn mad with footsteps--has been---uhh---slightly altered.
 
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