Favorite Author (dead and still with us)

Fyodor Mikhailovich Dostoevsky.
Plato.
Kavafis.
Kazantzakis.
Elytis.
Seferis.
Eberikos.
Kavvadias.
Papadiamantis.
James Joys.
Oscar Wilde.
Tennessee Williams.
Tolstoi.
Dante.
 
Knut Hamsun, August Strindberg, Fyodor Dostoyevsky, Louis Ferdinand Celine, Friedrich Nietzsche, Soren Kierkegaard, Stanislaw Lem, S.J. Perelman, William Murray, Frederick Exley, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Arthur Schopenhauer, James Thurber, Charles Dickens, Nikolai Gogol, John Fante, Charles Bukowski.
 

LickTheStar

Sad Flower in the Sand
Over 1000 posts
Most of my favorite authors are dead... Which is somewhat depressing... Beside Bukowksi, here's some:

HST
John Fante
Dan Fante (Better short story writer than novel writer, but I still like him)
Hubert Selby
Kerouac (despite his later works, Dharma Bums and On The Road are two of my favorite novels)
Toni Morrison
Gloria Naylor
Ken Kesey (his jail journal is a trip)

Uhh... I'm sure there's more. I'm a bit of an American author fan... I like older poets too... Eliot, Dunbar, Yeats... Uhhh... That's about as far as I go now... That's the tops though.
 
Dead:
Bukowski
Miller
HST
Celine
Hemingway
Chandler
Hughes (Ted)
Hamsun

Still with us:
Ellroy
Houellebecq
Heaney
Cave (Nick)

Looks like dead win 8 to 4.
 

pig ear press

Over 500 posts
Roald Dahl
Buk
J.Fante
Celine
Roth
Hemingway
Milligan
Gutierrez

do lyricists count in this list?

if so...

Billy Callaghan
Mark Linkous
Kurt Wagner
 
hunter s thompson
franz kafka
gabriel garcia marquez
isabel allende
charles bukowski
jim carroll
ayn rand

meh...i'm kind of all over the place
 

wayne

Founding member
hard to pick one

Buk-castaneda-sara przytyke-twain-vonnegut-and a whole bunch of bios,its hard to pick one over the other sum days Buk is number one and other days ,well thats it its another day so my mood changes and what was number one is now #2.just like food,one day steaks the next pizza but the one i go back the most is Buk he has something the others don't what it is i am not sure but its'good.
 

bogthing

Over 100 posts
Uh...it's early but the coffee's starting to have an effect

Departed:

O'Connor
Melville
Conrad
London
Carver
Thompson, Jim
Thompson, H.S.T.
Lawrence, D.H.
V.S. Pritchett

Still aboard:

Frazier
Vollman
Klinkenborg

My brain is a goddamned seive, I can't retain much it seems. I can remember that Tim Gorman was the 1968 spitting champ, but forgot what I did yesterday.

Anyhow, this is a partial list of stuff I've read and liked, but I'm sure there's a few I've forgotten, and then there's all those I'm yet to read.
 

David

Over 500 posts
Homer
Catullus
Stevens
Hopkins
Rilke
Joyce
Saroyan
Miller
cummings
Hemingway
Pound
Nietzsche
Dostoyevsky
Hesse
Salinger
Kerouac
Ginsberg
Bukowski
D.H. Lawrence
Robert Graves
Aldous Huxley
 

Lolita Twist

Rose-hustler
Over 500 posts
Dead but still with us:


Bukowski
Ginsberg
Hunter S. Thompson
Damon Runyon
Fante
Hemingway
Nietzche
Socrates (shut up.)
Morrison (")
Dickens (Tale of Two Cities? Longest love letter ever written to an alcoholic, ever.)
There's more, too. Just, not having read a large portion of works by the guys that Buk was "inspired" by, I feel like a whore, or a pimp, putting them here.
 
Bukowski
J.D Salinger
William S. Burroughs
Kurt Vonnegut
John Fante
Bob Dylan
Ezra Pound
T.S Eliot
Albert Camus
Franz Kafka
Carson McCullers
Hunter S. Thompson
Ken Kesey
Sylvia Plath
Tony O'Neill
Willy Vlautin
James Joyce
Harvey Pekar
Dylan Thomas
Jack Kerouac
 
dead and living:
bukowski
sartre
vonnegut
hamsun
fante
palahniuk
cummings
neruda
gottlieb
welsh (irvine)
chomsky
kalle lasn
sedaris
burroughs (william and augusten)
kafka
de beauvoir
plath
kerouac
camus
heidegger
huxley


and more that i don't think are as important because i can't think of them. :]
 

CarversDog

RIP
Over 500 posts
Two of my favorite authors who are, amazingly, still alive and still producing vibrant work:

John Updike
Joan Didion

Updike's new novel, "The Widows of Eastwick", was just named one of the NYT's 50 best novels of the year, and Didion, survivor of many personal tragedies, is writing the screenplay for an HBO bio-pic of Washington Post publisher Katherine Graham.
 
The Book of Disquiet

An author who doesn't seem to get written about on this forum I like most is Fernando Pessoa. His book "The Book of Disquiet" must be the pure essence of despair. Dare I say more pure than Bukowski. Apparently I am supposed to write foolish things on this forum. I just doing what I'm told.

Other authors I like:
Michel Houellebecq
John Fante
Sherwood Anderson
Billy Childish - music, art, as well.
Knut Hamsun
Paul Bowles
Gunter Grass - "Tin Drum" seen the movie three times.
Louis-Ferdinand Celine
Blaise Cendrars - "Moravagine" has to be the best French/Swiss novel in existence.
Chuck Palahniuk - definitely "Fight Club" but also definitely "Survivor" both anti-civilisation classics.
Kafka.
Albert Camus

Yes it is true that I have followed Bukowski's reading trail, and I am growing a little tired of it now. I have just started reading bizarro fiction and absurdist fiction for what I thought was going to be a change, and guess what? It's very similar to the short story fiction of Bukowski. Andersen Prunty is anyway. He is all I have read so far, amazon.com are taking their time getting the books to me here in Australia.
All helps with writing.

I also followed Louis-Ferdinand Celine's trail. Very short.
Guy de Maupassant
Gustave Flaubert
Jean Genet - who was influenced by Celine. Back to front trail.

Regards
Dino
 

LickTheStar

Sad Flower in the Sand
Over 1000 posts
I'd like to add Father Luke to my list of favorite living authors...

Assuming I get a postscript...
 

justin grimbol

Over 100 posts
bukowski
elizabeth eberhart(oblivion seekers)
tao chien(the bukowski of ancient chinese poetry)
jg ballard
cormac mccarthy
celine
sedaris
james crumley
dan fante
stephen king
garrison keilor
ws burroughs, but only for queer and junky
 

Ambreen

Sordide Sentimental
Over 500 posts
Here are mine !

As I'm not fond of hierarchical classifications, I put them in alphabetical order :

Louis Aragon ; Jane Austen ; Honoré de Balzac ; Jules Barbey d'Aurevilly ; François Bon ; Bertolt Brecht ; Emily, Charlotte and Anne Brontë ; Charles Bukowski ; William Burroughs ; Lord Byron ; Louis Calaferte ; Albert Camus ; Céline ; Chateaubriand ; Pierre Choderlos de Laclos ; Samuel Taylor Coleridge ; Fedor Dostoïevski ; Alexandre Dumas ; Marguerite Duras ; John Fante ; Edward Morgan Forster ; Jean Genet ; Jean Giono ; Goethe ; Günter Grass ; Knut Hamsun ; Thomas Hardy ; Ernest Hemingway ; E.T.A. Hoffmann ; Victor Hugo ; Karl Joris Huysmans ; Henrik Ibsen ; Henry James ; Franz Kafka ; John Keats ; Jack Kerouac ; Rudyard Kipling ; Milan Kundera ; Hanif Kureishi ; Lautréamont ; D.H. Lawrence ; J-M-G. Le Clézio ; Cormac McCarthy ; André Malraux ; Thomas Mann ; Katherine Mansfield ; Guy de Maupassant ; Yukio Mishima ; Vladimir Nabokov ; George Orwell ; Boris Pasternak ; Henri-Pierre Roché ; George Sand ; Jean-Paul Sartre ; Shakespeare ; Percy Shelley ; John Steinbeck ; Tchekhov ; Tolstoi ; Boris Vian ; Irvine Welsh ; Edith Wharton ; Walt Whitman ; Oscar Wilde ; Virginia Woolf ; Emile Zola ; Stefan Zweig.
 
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David

Over 500 posts
What's your favorite Burroughs, Nabokov and Le Clezio books and what do you think about Le Clezio getting the Nobel Prize?
 

Ambreen

Sordide Sentimental
Over 500 posts
Burroughs > I only read The naked lunch, but it was a revelation. In my presentation topic, I said that before Bukowski, I never read such crude words. But actually, I did ; I just forgot to quote Burroughs (and also Lautréamont).
Nabokov > Lolita.
Le Clézio > I rediscovered and appreciated him thanks to his Nobel Prize. The fact is that when I was 11 or 12, I read some of the short stories he wrote for youngsters and they didn't please me, so that I totally neglected him for years. After he obtained the Nobel, I wanted to give him a second chance, and I chose a book everyboby suggested me : Désert, which deeply captivated me.
This Nobel being attributed to a French writer of course delighted me, especially at a time where it has become fashionable to talk about the so-called decline of French culture (see the famous Time Magazine's article in 2007 which gave birth to a book one year later...). Authors who receive it all write books dealing with issues that have a universal dimension, i.e. books transcending borders of all kind. It turns out that Le Clezio's work is perfectly in line with that "world literature", his books mainly developing such themes as humanity, identity, civilisations, and cultural diversities. He's a real citizen of the world who travels a lot, his trips feeding his work. His sober and poetical style also contributes to his universality.
Two other French names circulated : Patrick Modiano and Annie Ernaux. But these ones are too "Franco-French" writers, they had no chance to win it compared with Le Clézio.
One of my professors published one of his books in the early 90s. She described him as a very agreeable and humble person and enjoyed working with him.
 
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Mark73

Over 500 posts
... in no particular order:

Howard Phillips Lovecraft
Charles Bukowski
George Orwell
Nick Hornby
Wolfgang Hohlbein
Patrick Süsskind
Stephen King
Kurt Brecht ( D.R.I.'s vocalist )
Frank Herbert
Jeremy John Ratter aka Penny Rimbaud
Michail Alexandrowitsch Bakunin
 
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