Justin Hyde ... (1 Viewer)

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Black Swan

Abord the Yorikke!
Yeah David, but let's look at it this way ,purple is always nice but it does something strange to me, red is hot as chili sauce, blue is a slide guitar, green is in, yellow is Buk's favorite color , brown is the new black, orange is queen's day in Holland, white is easier , black is the latest so I guess once it was first.
So, who is on first...:p
where is the PH thread?
 

Father Luke

Founding member
Charcoal. Casual, elegant, and
may be worn in any season.

2523498164_da7d7564be_o.jpg


The people look like flowers at last.
- Sir Charles
 

Gerard K H Love

Appreciate your friends
No that looks like a drag queen. Please don't do that to Charles Bukowski ever again.

It's funny I saw a guy with a complection like that and hair like that but not that blouse and jacket or whatever. He thought he looked hip. I snickered to myself quietly.
 

Gerard K H Love

Appreciate your friends
But what if the next Bukowski was a woman?

Good point. (Nice new avatar-notice green hat.)
If the next Bukowski was a woman: She would have to have endured a very rough and tramatic upbringing and would have wandered around for about 10 or 12 years. Plus the acne vulgarus. I don't know....would her mother have to be abusive to her and her father be the more passive? What factors would bring about that possibility? Or has Father Luke now demonstrated how absurd the main question is to begin with? In that case very good point.

The very spiritual wisdom shines through our very inspired man of the cloth here on this forum. Thank you and once again nice green hat, very fitting.
 

hank solo

Just practicin' steps and keepin' outta the fights
Reaper Crew
Moderator
Founding member
Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha!


HAaaaaaa!!!!

:D
 

Gerard K H Love

Appreciate your friends
Hahahahahahaha! snort! Hahahaha!
That looks like someone you could meet from an online dating service. She gets the big hands from her father's side of the family.
Where is the green hat??
 
In the end my purpose for starting this thread was to see what the people here had to say about this topic, the review and whether or not there can be a Next Bukowski. I enjoyed reading the responses and never meant to offend anybody or get anybody all worked up.

I am pretty sure I didn't offend the author...because that was never my purpose.

Again, I truly enjoy Hyde's poetry...I recommend buying the chapbook. It's quite well done...both writing-wise and the book itself...courtesy of Brian Fugett over at Zygote in my Coffee.
 

wayne

Founding member
The next - there is no next. mjp hit it on the head with his reply - you only pass this way once in life and the Buk lived and wrote that way. The next, I don't think so.
 
The Next Bukowski?

I just read the new Justin Hyde chapbook and I think it's very, very good. I'm not sure I understand all the "He is the new Bukowski!" hoopla, mostly because, while it's obvious his work owes ALOT to Bukowski, Hyde's own voice is in there too. It's quite rare, to see someone able to pick up the essence of Bukowski (the brokenness of spirit, the escapism-through-booze, the prevailing decency of the narrator, despite some terribly bad luck), and not merely copy the nihilism, the drinking, and the debauchery.

Since this guy is only 30, it will be very interesting to see how his work evolves over time. It's some of the best new poetry I've read in a long time, and I highly recommend it.
 
Don't remind me

I would be interested to hear what people here at bukowski.net have to say about this:

http://www.outsiderwriters.org/content/view/690/1/

Especially those who have read his work.

My idiosyncratic viewpoint.

I've only read the Hyde poems in the article itself, and that's a very small sampling, I realize. But I miss the absolute seamless rhythm, the unfaltering pace of Bukowski's lines when compared to this brief sampling of Hyde's. I sometimes have to double-back with Hyde to reread or try to capture his rhythm because there is a very subtle faltering in the way it hits the eye... I'm easy thrown off the mark by most writers even if the verbal pictures they draw are essentially good. That never happens with me with Bukowski - his rhythm and words move forward always without a hitch or a glitch, and I've read thousand upon thousands of rounds of Bukowski's prose and poetry. It's one of the factors I admire so greatly about his awesome output.

I think the article does Hyde a disservice by drawing the comparison between the two: it puts the thought in the reader's mind to compare Hyde to a true literary master that might not have existed as strongly otherwise, rather than letting Hyde's work stand on its own and allowing the readers to draw their own comparisons or not. But it's part of the promotional process, like saying someone is the next Charlie Parker.

I've found over the years that if I am reminded of anyone but the original when I'm reading or listening, I'm immediately suspect and lose interest. I consider them good but not great. It's confusing to the brain to read Hyde and be reminded of Bukowski, and the writing ends up seeming derivative. The true originals don't remind the reader or listener of anyone but themselves, whether it's someone like Bukowski, Billie Holiday, the great jazz alto-player Charlie Parker, Dylan, Miles Davis, Henry Miller, Vonnegut, Fante, and so on.

What the article missed out on is whether Hyde has ever read Bukowski. If not, it places an entirely different spin on his poems. But of course, he probably has and the influence seeps through the floorboards and for me floods the decks. I think Bukowski found his rhythmic voice when he was writing about Herbert Hoover in elementary school; Hyde is 30 (if I'm correct about that) and is perhaps not yet fully formed beyond the Bukowski comparison. Maybe if I read more of Hyde I'd feel differently. But that's a problem because I already lack the motivation to do so. Nevertheless, Hyde may have a great deal to say for those who've never read Bukowski or consider Bukowski an anachronism. (Their loss!) Or perhaps it's a matter of Hyde's endurance. In any event, I wish Hyde the best for those who are drawn to him.

Poptop
 

mjp

Founding member
I just read the new Justin Hyde chapbook and I think it's very, very good.[...]
Imagine that, your first post and it reads like a poorly written press release. I suppose we'll see you again when Mr. Hyde's next chapbook comes out. You need to work on your fake-fan shill in the meantime though. It's quite transparent at the moment, and not easy to pull off under the best of circumstances.
 
It's some of the best new poetry I've read in a long time, and I highly recommend it.

We might actually believe you if you introduced yourself in the new blood forum and had something good or even bad to say about Bukowski. We are not idiots, although enterprising Capitalists like you might like to think so.

Identify and relate; don't sell yourself out here. Too many of us have had the inconvenience of people trying to buy our souls. Mine's worn thin enough; please leave it alone.

And it may well be very good. But I sure as hell won't read it just because you presented it this way. Congratulations. You failed.
 
I have absolutely NOTHING to gain by "shilling" the Hyde chapbook, as you so charmingly put it. As far as "introducing" myself, and letting everyone know how much I admire Charles Bukowski, visiting a thread such as this speaks for itself, doesn't it?

I SINCERELY thought the Hyde book was honest and fresh. Compared to the stale, bland, over-wrought stuff I've been reading lately, it's pretty goddamn good. Period.
 

bospress.net

www.bospress.net
As far as "introducing" myself, and letting everyone know how much I admire Charles Bukowski, visiting a thread such as this speaks for itself, doesn't it?
Lucinda,
How did you just happen to find this thread in a forum with hundreds of threads and just happen to have read the book in question? It is all just too curious... If you were sent here on a blog or forum fine, but it should be noted. If you were shown this link by someone pushing my hyde's book, fine, but it should be mentioned.

Otherwise it certainly gives the appearance that you were send here to shill for the author or publisher.

And if everything else that you are reading is stale and bland then you need to look deeper. There are many damn good young poets writing out there. Many of them, like mr hyde, remain completely unknown to the poetry world and relatively unknown to the small press.

Bill
 
I agree that I need to look deeper to find interesting stuff to read. I heard about the Hyde book from this thread. I was surfing around, reading the forums, and the thread title "The Next Bukowski" grabbed me. So I ordered the book, thinking, "this is going to be yet another dreadful Bukowski impersonation" and was really quite pleasantly surprised.

It's embarassing for me that Bukowski is the only poet I can stand to read. thank god he was so prolific!

Can you recommend any other contemporary poets? I was thinking about subscribing to The NY Quarterly, to get an idea of what's being written, NOW, but I'm not sure if that's a good mag or not....
 

mjp

Founding member

bospress.net

www.bospress.net
Can you recommend any other contemporary poets? I was thinking about subscribing to The NY Quarterly, to get an idea of what's being written, NOW, but I'm not sure if that's a good mag or not....

There are some great ones that I can mention. They all have their own voice and although they have read Bukowski, they do not write like him or about the stereotypical booze, women, racetracks, etc... The only comparison to Bukowski is that they write what they KNOW and now what they think that they should write.

Those that immediately pop up are:

justin.barrett
Christopher Cunningham
Hosho McCreesh
Father Luke
David Barker

That being said, I have published all five, so I'm not trying to push my books on anyone (and want to disclose that I would push them even if I had not published them, but that would beg the question, if I liked their writing why would I NOT publish them?). They have also been published by other presses and those books are VERY worth it. Plus, I'm all sold out of Father Luke, David Barker and Christopher Cunningham anyway.

The GPP site is great because is lets you read the 44 or so broadsides that we have published and that will give you a great sampling of these poets and others.

My point being that there are a bunch of very talented entertaining poets that are writing today in their own voice.

A couple other websites:

www.justinbarrett.com
www.fatherluke.com

Both of these talented writers put a lot of their writing on the site and make it available for anyone that cares to read it free of charge.

Best,
Bill
 
I can vouch for the Bill's recommendation of Father Luke and David Barker, but I haven't read the other writers he mentioned. I'm also a fan of Tom Clark. He's another Black Sparrow poet.
 
Anyway, looking for the "next Bukowski" implies trying to replace him, and that's a pointless effort. The next Bukowski will not write the way Bukowski did, or the way Justin Hyde does. The next Bukowski will not fit in to the current accepted literary standards. Most of us will not enjoy - or be tolerant of - his or her work. It will certainly not read like anything around today.

And the author will not bother trying to build their own personal Bukowski-lite myth, the way that so many imitators do. They will create something new, and that's what will make them the next Bukowski.


completely agree.
 
Thanks for the recommendations. I haven't heard of any of them, but then, that's really no surprise.

It's gotten so bad, as far as books, that when I walk into my local chain bookstore, I feel kind of sick. The titles, the cover art - all geared toward selling the damn thing.
 

mjp

Founding member
...when I walk into my local chain bookstore, I feel kind of sick.
Well there's your problem. You are looking for needles in haystacks.

If you live within 50 miles of one of the 3 or 4 independent bookstores left in the world you should use them. Otherwise, the internet is the best bet. When you find a poet you like, ask them who they like. Within a week you'll have all you can read and more.
 

bospress.net

www.bospress.net
Yes, great idea. I found almost every poet that I love by seeing who other poets read. I'm not talking about Bukowsk specifically. In the small press, I'd run into an amazing poet and they would say "Have you read XXXXX?" He is great! Then I'd get an e-mail from XXXX with amazing poems....

The big stores not a complete waste of time, but you can find great poets by looking in the small press.

Bill
 

Gerard K H Love

Appreciate your friends
I can vouch for the Bill's recommendation of Father Luke and David Barker, but I haven't read the other writers he mentioned. I'm also a fan of Tom Clark. He's another Black Sparrow poet.

Lucinda;
How nice of you to stop by. I can vouch for Purple's above as well as Justin Barrett and Michael Phillips. I read Justin Hyde and I liked what I read, but I like the others mentioned perhaps a little more.
Maybe Justin Hyde can be the next Justin Barrett. ;)
 
Well there's your problem. You are looking for needles in haystacks.

If you live within 50 miles of one of the 3 or 4 independent bookstores left in the world you should use them. Otherwise, the internet is the best bet. When you find a poet you like, ask them who they like. Within a week you'll have all you can read and more.

There isn't even a Barnes and Noble in my town. There's a Books-A-Million and a Walden books......

I went to the Guerilla Poetics Projcect website and really liked it. The broadsides were wonderful, the whole idea of it is wonderful.....as soon as I have the 25 bucks to join I'm going to. I also visited the FatherLuke website and enjoyed his stuff as well.

It seems there is a whole teeming subculture of poetry that I knew nothing about. Bukowksi, however, is still king....

Thanks for the recommendations.
 
Well......

Fucking, utterly fantastic!
Sublime..... and succinct!

Father Luke said:
"What strikes me is that Bukowski broke open
everything he knew about what poetry was, and
made it his own. He made poetry something he
wanted to read.

Bukowski was an innovator. He knew his field, and
he stepped up, and walked to the front of the line with a:

Here I am. I will be counted among you fuckers.

Not many have that. Not many have the ability to
transcend their history. He had that. He knew his
history. He knew who those fuckers were. He'd
read them, he'd studied them.

And, eventually, he knew himself as among them.
History has given him a place, I believe, for his innovation,
and his clear voice. It came with quite a price. "
That's it! I can go and die now.... Switch off the lights...
That's all, everything I needed to know.

I've never ever read anything as simple yet dynamic as that assessment of my all time favorite poet- novelist.
 

hoochmonkey9

Art should be its own hammer.
Reaper Crew
Moderator
Founding member
I recommend Michael Phillips.

me too.
I have 2 of his books and I like both.
I prefer Riding Out the Dumb Silence, but I have a feeling he does also.
I look forward to his next book, which I hear is a music-centric memoir, which is right up my alley.
 

Ponder

"So fuck Doubleday Doran"
RIP
I look forward to his next book, which I hear is a music-centric memoir, which is right up my alley.

I have no clue when his next book or whatever it is comes out.
In a month or 6 weeks, or in october or next year w're able to read some of his unpublished poems. Isn't it annoying that those publishers & editors & their need for unpublished pomes?
Sometimes I feel blessed I don't write poems at the moment.
 

hank solo

Just practicin' steps and keepin' outta the fights
Reaper Crew
Moderator
Founding member
one step removed - by Charles Bukowski

I knew a lady who once lived with Hemingway.
I knew a lady who claimed to have screwed Ezra Pound.
Sartre invited me to visit him in Paris but I was too stupid to
accept.
Caresse Crosby of Black Sun Press wrote me from Italy.
Henry Miller's son wrote that I was a better writer than his
father.
I drank wine with John Fante.
but none of this matters at all except in a romantic sort of
way.
some day they'll be talking about me:
"Chinaski wrote me a letter."
"I saw Chinaski at the racetrack."
"I watched Chinaski wash his car."
all absolute nonsense.
meanwhile, some wild-eyed young man
alone and unknown in a room
will be writing things that will make you forget
everybody else
except maybe the young man to
follow after
him.
 

Hosh

hoshomccreesh.com
I agree with many of the names of the undiscovered poets mentioned here. Try Bottle of Smoke Press, sunnyoutside press, Centennial Press, & Kendra Steiner Editions--you'll find something to read, no doubt about it.

But there are some more folks who also bear mentioning: Doug Draime, Anne Menebroker, William Taylor, Jr., Brian McGettrick, Richard Krech, Naomi Shabib Nye, David Barker, Caset Rearick, Ed Galing, Albert Huffstickler, Michael Kreisel, Luis Berriozabal, Winans, Locklin, Antler, Charles Nevismal, Adrian Manning, Kat Paul Flannagan...all of these people (& some I am forgetting I am sure) have written poems I love & re-read trying to unlock their magic. The micropress is brimming with great stuff--you just have to know where to look.

& if Justin Hyde is -or- isn't the "next Bukowski," I will say that DOWN WHERE THE HUMMINGBIRD GOES TO DIE is a pretty damn good book, & a nice production as well. The cover art is sublime.

Lucinda--hopefully you find some things to read from these folks. I think they're all great writers.
 
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