Perception of THE DOORS

mjp

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Still trying to wrap my head around this thinking. Seeing how the term punk wasn't used until the mid '70s.
I think what we're saying is that punk is an attitude, not a style of music. It could have been named something else 100 years ago, because there were punks then too. It just happened to stick to that particular term at that particular time.
 

slimedog

Over 1000 posts
I agree that punk music had a lot to do with attitude but I think it was a definite style of music from a certain time and people like Dylan had nothing to do with it and hardly any influence. I know a lot of punk folks were influenced by Buk but I wouldn't call him one and I'm sure he'd want nothing to do with it.

Now, Morrison not a punk but according to Iggy Pop he started singing after seeing a particulary bad performance in Michigan by him and thought hell, he could do at least as good as that.

The Doors played at Boston Arena in 69, 70 and an older friend saw it & said as they were waiting in line to get in a drunk Morrison behind a glass partition was yelling at the crowd, "You suckers!"

I won't claim Morrison as a punk but that's a move worthy of John Lydon- who at the time when he was displaying his hatred for all established bands actually said he liked the Doors in an interview.
 

mjp

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I agree that punk music had a lot to do with attitude but I think it was a definite style of music from a certain time...
Do you think the Clash were a punk band? Assuming the answer is 'yes' (and if it's not, we're in the wrong thread, or on the wrong planet) let me ask you what "definite style of music" that is on London Calling, or Sandinista! Because I sure as hell couldn't describe it using one pigeonhole.

It doesn't matter how SST records, those kids with the giant stand up Mowhawks, Avril Lavigne or Blink 182 define punk. It was defined by the people who started it, and they were all over the map in terms of styles and influences.
 

homeless mind

Over 500 posts
I think what we're saying is that punk is an attitude, not a style of music. It could have been named something else 100 years ago, because there were punks then too. It just happened to stick to that particular term at that particular time.
Guess I just got punk'd.

From that crow's nest, I see what you're saying.


You aren't married to Demi Moore, are you?
 

slimedog

Over 1000 posts
Do you think the Clash were a punk band? Assuming the answer is 'yes' (and if it's not, we're in the wrong thread, or on the wrong planet) let me ask you what "definite style of music" that is on London Calling, or Sandinista! Because I sure as hell couldn't describe it using one pigeonhole.

It doesn't matter how SST records, those kids with the giant stand up Mowhawks, Avril Lavigne or Blink 182 define punk. It was defined by the people who started it, and they were all over the map in terms of styles and influences.
I agree that the original punk bands had a lot of individuality, Lydon likes to point that out when dissing the cookie cutter punk bands of today, but still there is a definitive style of what punk music is just like there are definitions of country rock, heavy metal etc.

What bugs me is people seem to apply that punk was just an attitude/philosophy or fad and had nothing to do with musical innovation. The band that really created and is probably the most influential is the Ramones. You would not have to see a picture of them to know something radical was going on, especially at the time. It was the most shocking album I'd heard because-songs were two minutes long, lyrics was sometimes 3 lines, and NO GUITAR SOLOS!

So it sometimes apears people think it was just guys with weird hairdos being obnoxious but it's not the case.

So when people say Dylan or Cash or whomever was a punk, you can argue in attitude but no they did not make punk music or would they want to be considered that way. No one would take a heavy metal band and say "Oh, but they're country rock in spirit."

And the Clash first album is punk after that they became a rock band or at least made music that would mostly fall in other catergories.
 
It seems, Morrison and Bukowski even published poetry in the same mag in 1971, if I got it right:

--> http://search.abaa.org/dbp2/book350417794.html


Plus, they did meet :)

--> http://www.geocities.com/jimmozz/buk.htm

Shit, I can't believe that site still exists. It must be older than I.
I gotta defend Densmore, again big fan of the Doors moderate fan of Densmore.

Taste is always subjective, I can't stand Bonham but I understand his talent. Densmore is technically, a very fine drummer and for the sixities he was probably one of the best rock ones.

And as far as making a buck off Morrison he has been the one who doesn't want to sell the songs for commercials and fought and won against the other two remaining Doors to make them discontinue using the name (they're now Riders On The Storm). Everyone can guess what Morrison would do now but he was against commercial use while he was still alive (he nixed having Light My Fire for a car commercial).

By the way the Doors had a legal agreement of equal partners and everyone agreeing on something to make it happen.

In light of this it would appear to me that Densmore is Morrisons only true friend as he is holding up his wishes.
I'm gonna defend Densmore also. I thought Riders On The Storm was very honest and straightforward. Very little bullshit. Reflective on how sad it is to see a close friend sink into alcoholism with little you can do about it. As far as the "new-agey" thing is concerned, I know he started reading a lot of Joseph Campbell which deals with mythologies. I recommend The Power Of Myth. There's no new-age crap in that.
 
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i never knew morrison or the doors personally but i did dance live to them the night i auditioned for a go-go grl job at Whisky (knew elmer valentine, a good Bossman, slightly); in the 60s i preferred Soul Music, easier to dance to Otis Redding, Wilson Picket, Aretha Franklin; the Doors too complex and deep geniusly l o n g..the night i met morrison he was stoned and stinky, wearing wrinkled jeans; i was a square, waiting for a prince to find me;later i began to love the Doors and today have their orig 1st album framed hanging on the wall near my bukowski head..
 

Ponder

"So fuck Doubleday Doran"
RIP
Over 1000 posts
And I've read all the Morrison books
gagaku

jim morrison sat in this room
once told me how I
ruined a good poem

"just like ginsberg," said jim,
"a good poem and right in the middle a turd"

he was talking about form
and then I read his poems
but never got to tell him

jim died in paris of an overdose they say
they say he was in a bath-tub
smiling

dead
and grinning

broken on through

the face of the dead is more relaxed than the
supposed living face

this is a fact

© Steve Richmond

Note: this is not the original lay-out of the poem.
 

homeless mind

Over 500 posts
I do; on 8-Track.
It will make a comeback, trust me...:eek:

That ranks as the worst post-death-frontman album ever made.

Bar none.

It sits right next to the books that (fill in the words here) to make $$$$.
 

homeless mind

Over 500 posts
Bruno, The Soft Parade (song) is overrated. As a lifelong Doors' fan, I cringe when I hear it. The writing is bad, the concept is bad; it was if they were trying to take The End and When The Music's Over and put 'em in a blender, with some John Lennon lyrics, and create something retread/new.

Other than that, it really kicks ass...

Pax
 

CRBSMILE

Over 500 posts
This is weird. There is an author, TRACY DUNHAM, who wrote 2 novels titled after Doors songs. Wishful Sinful and Yes, The River Knows. They're like kitschy mysteries. No, I've not read them. Saw them a while back and was just reminded yesterday. Thought I'd drop it on you. CRB:)
 

homeless mind

Over 500 posts
Hello, CRB!

Sound like great titles.

For Doors' songs...:eek:

Have you read any of her works? Who knows, maybe she's the cat's pajamas.

For mysteries, I turn to EAP.

I get broken after that...

Pax
 

Bruno Dante

Over 500 posts
Bruno, The Soft Parade (song) is overrated. As a lifelong Doors' fan, I cringe when I hear it. The writing is bad, the concept is bad; it was if they were trying to take The End and When The Music's Over and put 'em in a blender, with some John Lennon lyrics, and create something retread/new.
I meant the album by the way. The song itself is a bit dodgy.
 

homeless mind

Over 500 posts
Let's talk turkey, which Ben Franklin wanted as America's bird, in lieu of the eagle.

The song sucks. And the album is quite mediocre.

It was a let-down to most Doors' fans. As the music was weak, and the lyrics weaker. "Touch Me" "”"” Doesn't ignite my fire -- Let's Get fucking real.

Here's my "Shaman Blues"

Drink some more and head on out to LA.

Yeah, baby.

LA WOMAN!

Now that fucking rocks the house.

On Sunday afternoons....driving through your suburbs, into your blues...

Pax
 
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Pogue Mahone

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Not a huge Doors fan and I hope I am not opening up new interest in this thread. But this is supposedly the piece in which Tom Robbins says he found his voice as a writer. (this is a reprint in Underground Digest - Vol. 1, No. 2 - 1967). I'm not a big Tom Robbins fan either, but for posterity...

IMG_20160704_0010a.jpg
 

Johannes

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Over 1000 posts
That's great, thanks for posting!

This review sounds slightly weird lol.

I mean it comes across in the same way try hard as say the other "underground counterculture writers" in Sunlight Here I Am for example. Guys like Don Strachan (p. 63) or Ric Reynolds (p. 73). Like some young douchebag with probably the best intentions, but very much high on himself.

On the other hand and with the benefit of historical distance, say a parent found this review about this popular band his teenage daughter was into and it begins with: "Their style is early cunnilingual with overtones of the Massacre of the Innocents. An electrified sex slaughter."

They'd probably believed the decline of the west had arrived . Which might be exactly the reason why their teenage daughter wanted to go see The Doors :D
 

mjp

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That's a great price for vintage prints. I would think that these are worth more than that, just based on what you have to pay for a real print of most famous musicians or bands. It will be a good score for a Doors fan.
 
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