Seen any good movies lately? - Films you MUST see (1 Viewer)

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'the last life in the universe', a Thai film which is totally engaging. If you can handle slow paced beauty without the thousand plot twists and explosions then this may be the film for you...
plus if anyone has seen it what do you think was happening in the film? (the film asks many questions of the viewer without providing neatly packaged answers)
 

number6horse

okyoutwopixiesoutyougo
This was a beautiful film - very dream-like and sensual, with some sad and beautiful moments. The scene where the girl settles down for a smoke (hash?) and the breeze begins to blow through the house (or is it her sister's spirit returning?) and she comes upon the photograph of her dead sister - very moving scene that is hard to describe accurately. You've got to see it.

As for how the plot "wrapped up", I was a little confused. I think he killed the hit-men, but maybe not. There were some intentionally loose threads in it, but that only added to the intrigue. I will see this one again for sure.

And Paul giamatti would make a perfect Bukowski for any upcoming movies!

When I read this, I was reminded of the film "Sideways" where Giamatti quotes Buk. Funny scene. And yes, I agree he could make a great Bukowski.
 

Erik

If u don't know the poetry u don't know Bukowski
Founding member
The Proposition

Saw the Australian western "The Proposition" last night. Just out on DVD over here. Screenplay & soundtrack by Nick Cave. Strong strong stuff.
I find Nick Cave's apocalyptic style a bit overwrought at times, but not in this flick. Cave has written some magic dialog for this movie. There are echos of Heart of Darkness, Apocalypse Now, Dylan's Masked & Anonymous, and Greek tragedy in here. My pick: John Hurt's performance as the eloquent bounty hunter Jellon Lamb.

Jellon Lamb: Forgive me, sir, but I've been stuck here with no one but this sorry sack of Hibernian pig shit for conversation. Poor, poor Dan O'Reilly. Sit, sir. Drink with me.
[Charlie cocks his gun and points it to Lamb]
Charlie Burns: One more crack about the Irish, Mr. Lamb, and I'll shoot you. Am I clear?
Jellon Lamb: Oh, as the waters of Ennis, sir. Let us drink, then, to the Irish. No finer race of men have ever... peeled a potato.
[Charlie cocks his gun again and points it to Lamb]
Charlie Burns: Do you pray, Mr. Lamb?


Oh, and not to forget the great soundtrack, its almost like one of the characters in the movie...
 
speaking of escape movies - and great movies - id jus like to mention a favorite filmmaker of mine, robert bresson. his "a man escapes" is wonderful - but almost all of his films are truly worthwhile. i would advise any living human being out there in the great wide world to check him out if you aint already done so. thats all.

paul
 

Bukfan

"The law is wrong; I am right"
Just saw the german film "Der Untergang" (The downfall) about the last days of Hitler, seen through the eyes of his secretary. The movie seems very historically correct. It's exiting and the actors are great, although the subject is a bit depressing. Certainly worth a watch...
 
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movie about sophie scholl (spelling?) - member of the white rose, germans against hitler. great movie. also the downfall was cool - plus "hitler's secretary" docu. - just footage of hitler's sec. talking, telling the story. she mustve been around upper 70's - died not long after the making.
 

Bukfan

"The law is wrong; I am right"
baby snakes zappa dvd. fucking great.

Indeed! I've got all the Zappa dvd's: Baby Snakes - Does Humor Belong in Music (The Pier NYC 1984) - A Token Of My Extreme - and the latest: The Dub Room Specials.
Baby Snakes is perhaps the best. And with the longest running time, about 2 hours and 45 min. I like the scene where Frank's singing Disco Boy and the girl in front looking at him almost in love. She turns up again later in the show and Frank says "Ah, you're the girl from Disco Boy" or words to that effect. Btw, you can also get Baby Snakes on cd...
 
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Barry Lyndon by the one and only Kubrick

Third time around, but I swear I'm not a fanatic.....

Clocks in at just over 3 hours but still think its Kubrick at his most efficient. In my opinion his best. Maybe...maybe..one of the best films ever...
 
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movie about sophie scholl (spelling?) - member of the white rose, germans against hitler. great movie. also the downfall was cool - plus "hitler's secretary" docu. - just footage of hitler's sec. talking, telling the story. she mustve been around upper 70's - died not long after the making.

Just got through with Don Delillo's Running Dog. It might be interesting for you to read this book immeadiately following viewing "Hitler footage." Delillo was definetly after getting the movement of cinema into this book.
 
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mjp

Founding member
Rude Boy, the Clash movie from 1980. Haven't seen it since '80 probably, and forgot what a horrible movie it was, but haven't forgotten how great the Clash could be. And there's a lot of great Clash performances here. Also a "Just play the Clash" option that edits out all the troublesome bits that are supposed to form the plot of the thing.
 

chronic

old and in the way
I saw this when it was in theaters as well. I don't remember it as being especially bad, but it was pretty slow moving. Is it out on DVD now?
 
jerzy ,

thanks for the delillo idea. ill look into it. i dont read much modern fiction. i dont read much fiction. as a matter of fact most writing that has come out in the last 20 years pretty much doesnt work for me at all. maybe i sound like bukowski here - i dont care. fiction is often too transparent. like you can tell the writer is jsut making it all up. that annoys the fucking hell out of me. give me knutson, celine, jeffers, bukowski, john berryman, hart crane, paul celan, trakl, hemingway, walt whitman, emily dickenson, james wright - i mean, just give me good writers writing about life the way it unfolds. most "fiction" seems to be about making money - not really going out on a limb and giving us a good story that is a story in and of itself. pure in the cold light of day.

thanks , paul
 
I'm with you on that Paul.

I've had friends try to get me to read Pynchon, Barth, Barthelme, Paluchnik, Eggers, etc., and I've tried a bit; none of it, none of it, stacks up to the Titans.

And the 19th century Russians: will there ever be Men that can write like that again?

But I do own an iPod and sometimes I forsake my bicycle and use the Metro. This is why I pick up a Delillo novel every now and again.
(William T. Vollmann, however, is a different story. A Titan does walk among us)

I feel the same about movies. The French New Wave is about as good as it gets for me. Also some of those Germans really new how to shape the art of cinema.... Chaplain, Buster Keaton, Kurosawa, Fritz Lang, The Great Robert Bresson.... America Cinema in the 70's before pre-Jaws, pre-Star Wars. Movies now mostly suck. Even the trite passing itself off as independent and alternative...
 
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jerzy ,

film is dead. everything looks the same now. everything is the same. no, to semi-quote bukowski, gambling. at least in america. but even the other countries are starting to follow america now. weak happy bullshit. or standard depressing bland and so on. jaws ruined evrything. that mind-set. that is the dividing line. cgi effects lack the human element. humanity is on the back-burner. where is the new bresson? fritz lang? everyone is running around with video cameras and calling it film.

do i sound bitter? ah ,

seek out the old. . .

love, paul
 
I wish I knew the term for it, but I loathe beyond words the lighting style in movies like Sparta. I guess it's the new style that's supposed to draw your attention away from how poor the movie is. I seem to be only one of two people I know personally that thinks Sparta looks like a piece of fancy, B-grade trash.
 
ninjerk ,

whatever has decided to make movies now has decided that they need to look abosolutely cold and perfect and completely composed and the sound must be loud and every little rustle in someones pants pocket must be audible. the story is nothing. computers write the stories. people, i am convinced, cannot (i hope for all our sakes) be this soulless. there is no depth of field, no mystery, no shadowy distance to become lost inside of - only rancid plot twists and commecial endorsements - see, the actor drinks a miller lite. oh my. please, everyone, stop going to the movies. go rent or buy or whatever - seek the historical cinema. there is so much you wont ever be able to get through it in 10 lifetimes. and it is good stuff. screw the present.

paul "bring me the head of alfredo garcia" b.
 
"Baby Snakes" is lovely for Zappa fans, non-Zappa fans have a lot of trouble with it. A great film, you really miss him, even after watching him for 2 and half hours. I caught "Elmer Gantry" last Sunday, a great subversive, almost surreal film. Very funny.
 

ROC

It is what it is
Just watched An Inconvenient Truth last night.
Mostly confirming what I already knew/suspcted, but still disturbing and well worth watching.
 

HenryChinaski

Founding member
"Baby Snakes" is lovely for Zappa fans, non-Zappa fans have a lot of trouble with it. A great film, you really miss him, even after watching him for 2 and half hours. I caught "Elmer Gantry" last Sunday, a great subversive, almost surreal film. Very funny.

indeed. zappa was a musical genius.
 
Film, by it's very essence, is superficial and that's why it appeals to most people. There has been occasionly good movies but I switched to reading books a long time ago and that's where I'll stay.
 

Erik

If u don't know the poetry u don't know Bukowski
Founding member
Film, by it's very essence, is superficial [...]

Awwww, now what do ya mean by that?
"It's essence?":eek:
Is "the essence" of the printed word something deep and meaningful?
Where do all the crappy suck-wind-thru-a-straw books come from then - hard work?
Come on now!
When "the essence" wanes the form appears.
 

Bukfan

"The law is wrong; I am right"
There crappy books and crappy movies. And there are good books and good movies. It's just two different medias. That's all...
 
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Being There with the excellent Peter Sellers and Gregory Peck in To Kill a Mockingbird also did justice, to say the least, to the respective books by the same name.
 
both "under the volcano" and "ironweed" were made into good movies - however - of course - the books were lots better.

paul the volcano
 

hoochmonkey9

Art should be its own hammer.
Reaper Crew
Moderator
Founding member
yes you're right.
a friend of mine who owns a video store does "dream casting"; taking films and putting his fantasy cast/crew to it. his choice for "under the volcano" was Richard Burton, directed by Sam Peckinpah. interesting, but with the amount of drinking those two could do, I don't know if the film ever would've made it past the first shot.
though, Bogart and Huston got "the african queen" done. so go figure.
 
hey , richard burton and sam - great idea. and william faulkner could do the screenplay (why not?).

just watched/rented koko the talking gorilla (criterion). good stuff. i dont know why i hadnt seen it long ago.
 
Awwww, now what do ya mean by that?
"It's essence?":eek:
Is "the essence" of the printed word something deep and meaningful?
Where do all the crappy suck-wind-thru-a-straw books come from then - hard work?
Come on now!
When "the essence" wanes the form appears.

Damn, no idea what any of this means, but I like the way you say it...

And I agree.

Just finished watching INFAMOUS, the 2006, and second biopic in two years, of Capote's IN COLD BLOOD.

Think I enjoyed it more than CAPOTE, but that just might be my knee-jerk petulance rearing.

Really liked the way this one developed the love connection between Capote and Smith. It may well have been fictionalized a bit (or a lot), but considering some of the criticisms regarding Capote doing just such with the story, it seems rather poetic.
 
The direction this thread has taken with the chatter about Fight Club and Sam Peckinpah I for one find pretty interesting. Peckinpah seemed pretty tuned into violence, even his own. Not only is this apparent in his westerns (which - much like the work of Buk - have their real meanings glossed over in favour of the tempting thrill of the myth), but maybe even moreso in his Straw Dogs. I would have loved to see what Peckinpah would have done with Fight Club.

If you like Fight Club give Staw Dogs a shot. In my opinion a much better social commentary on the unrecognized but inevitable violence which seems more and more to be defining masculinity.
 

hoochmonkey9

Art should be its own hammer.
Reaper Crew
Moderator
Founding member
If you like Fight Club give Staw Dogs a shot. In my opinion a much better social commentary on the unrecognized but inevitable violence which seems more and more to be defining masculinity.

I second that.
 
yes, indeed. sam, i believe, was one of the best filmmakers america has ever produced. even his last films - osterman weekend and the killer elite are better than the stuff propped up and pooped out today. sam lived in the moment. his characters lived there also. every second of his greatest films seems as if it were being transcribed from some dream - or nightmare (the same?). sam perfected the the western with the wild bunch - then reconfigured it with alfredo garcia, a semi-poetic-autobiography. i think of him kind of in the same way i think of sam - wonderers on the frontier - a dying west inside their heads - trying to translate their gut reactions as the red sun bleeds its way to night.

or something like that. (oh yes - straw dogs is a kind of savage treatise on the subject of violence - relentless. . .)

paul
 
a much better social commentary

Christ, I should be banned from any further movie talk for using this phrase in reference to Peckinpah's Staw Dogs! I retarct that "social commentary" shit... It's more like an explosion in the face of our deepest unknown fear of who we are, what we are capable of. It offers no answers, only more questions.

Now I'm gonna have to watch it again. Yet the movie is so hard to find! Some critics say its unpopularity has to do with the wife seeming to enjoy being raped. I think Peckinpah goes even further: we aren't sure what she's really feeling. That's the mystery that's still banned on the english tele to this day. While we're at we should ban all mystery!!!!!

Also will be looking for "Bring me the head...." I've known about it for awhile but have never seen it.

I think the best movie of 2006 was Tommy Lee Jones' "The three burials of Melquiades Estrada" This is the closest film has come to the spirit of Cormac McArthy's earlier novels, especially Blood Meridian.
 
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