any of yall into photography?

Andreas

Over 100 posts
#35
I like to view old photos, they can tell a lot of things. New York, Los Angeles, Moscow, Beijing, it doesn't matter.
The last L.A. 1964 picture reminds me of a Bukowski poem: Beach Trip.
 

Skygazer

And in the end...
Over 500 posts
#37
Was looking into authors using typewriters early on (the internet takes you to strange and wonderful places) Mark Twain, an early adopter of technology (and a close friend of Nikola Tesla) is credited with being the first to do a book manuscript on one - Life On The Mississipi memoir 1883 (although he may have used a typist to do it, if you want to quibble).These popped up when I was looking:
Twain in the lab with Tesla having a shot of electricity:

Mark-Twain-Nikola-Tesla-Laboratory-1894-e1381895589186.jpg


Early film Twain and family


Early film of Jack London

 

Andreas

Over 100 posts
#40
Great photography, such as no.5, people sitting on chairs watching the fire as if they were watching a movie, the entire front of the house on the left crashed down onto the street, you can see a piano in one of the rooms.
No.27 is pretty funny, a kind of natural response to a scholar isn't it, maybe the toppled statue could have stayed that way.
 

PhillyDave

“The essential doesn't change.” Beckett
Over 1000 posts
#42
I'm fascinated by NY in the 70's & 80's but in the 70's I was only zero to 9. If I was there in my 20's in the 70's I know I would have gotten my ass kicked.
 

d gray

tried to do his best but could not
Founding member
Over 1000 posts
#43
i was there in 78 but was only 14 so the wildest thing i did was manage to get a tour of the Marvel Comics headquarters.

which for a 14 year old comic freak was pretty wild.
 

mjp

So much been said and so little been done
Moderator
Founding member
Over 5000 posts
#44
It was dangerous in the 70s and early 80s, but it was pretty easy to avoid a lot of that danger. It was the random, unexpected danger and crime that'd get you. Problem was, that random, unexpected crime wasn't really restricted to the so-called "dangerous" areas of the city. It was always best to travel in a group, or better yet, a gang. Ha. Or with your band, if you looked like a gang.

I have to say though, as shitty and sometimes difficult as it was, I preferred the city back then to what it is today, which is more or less a city for tourists and the rich. Of course I didn't have to live there, the way some on this forum did.

The same thing could be said for a lot of big cities at the time. Los Angeles was certainly dangerous in the 80s, and they wouldn't just rob you here, they'd kill you for nothing. Same with parts of Chicago, Philadelphia, DC - it was an interesting time for American cities, after their heydays, but before they were re-civilized.
 

mjp

So much been said and so little been done
Moderator
Founding member
Over 5000 posts
#46
Yeah, I've seen those. Old pictures of Stooges gigs are great, all the kids sitting on the floor trying to ignore Iggy. He's laying on them, and still they look toward the stage. Awesome.

Audiences didn't really know what to do with him. The singer wasn't supposed to come into the audience and harass or molest you.

Iggy-and-the-Stooges-at-Farmington-High-School-in-Oakland-County-1970-trtrwrtw.jpg
 

skiroomalum

Never been to Waffle House, never been to me...
Over 1000 posts
#47
I was born and raised on Long Island, about a 45 minute train ride to Times Square. We went to "The City"
all the time, and I started going in on my own at about 12 or so. What I remember most were the 3 card monty
games, and the graffiti, both of which are pretty much gone.
I had my first bar drink, bought my first records and some other less-savory stuff in the early 80's in Manhattan.
NYC, much like Los Angeles, is about places that no longer exist. Mostly replaced by branch banks, chain drug
stores and fast-food joints. I guess that's not good or bad, just "progress."
I do miss Midnight Records, though.
 

PhillyDave

“The essential doesn't change.” Beckett
Over 1000 posts
#48
i was there in 78 but was only 14 so the wildest thing i did was manage to get a tour of the Marvel Comics headquarters.

which for a 14 year old comic freak was pretty wild.
I first went to some museums & Central Park with my Godmother/Aunt when I was young. That must have been around 83? I will never forget the subway rides, all the graffiti inside with the lights blinking on and off and the strange people sleeping or passed our or staring or I don't know what. And the door in between the cars & its window wouldn't shut properly. My Aunt had a cop take me & my younger brother for a wiz in the Grand Central bathroom too. That would explain my current state of mind! o_0o:abge:.
 

Pogue Mahone

Officials say drugs may have played a part
Over 1000 posts
#49
I remember losing $20 on three card monty at age 8 and wanting to kill the guy. I also remember being propositioned by an old asian guy in the bathroom at the Americana. And playing video games in a game room right on Times Square -- that's how low the rent must have been. When you see that kid in Fame living in an apartment above Times Square, it's totally believable from back then. I also remember the great garbage strike (1981) digital Casio watches and Checker cabs. There are still a few great dive bars about in Manhattan.
 
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mjp

So much been said and so little been done
Moderator
Founding member
Over 5000 posts
#52
Sorry, I changed the link. That embed was all screwy.

Mildly interesting project, but I think the video shows all I need to see. I suppose if you live in London it's more interesting.

I've never heard that song, Brixton Cat, it's good.
 
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