Classical Music Anyone?

Black Swan

Abord the Yorikke!
Over 1000 posts
Yesterday, I had 2 tickets to the concert. Kent Nagano was directing the OSM.
The first part was Mozart's Overture to the magic flute, then Violin Concerto No.5, then K. 219.
The second part was Anton Bruckner' Symphony No.3.
I didn't know Bruckner but thought that I knew someone who probably did.

help wanted and received

I'm stale sitting here
at this typewriter, the door open on my
little balcony when suddenly there is a roar in the sky,
Bruckner shouts back from
the radio and then the rain comes down glorious and violent,
and I realize that
it's good that the world can explode this way
because now
I am renewed, listening and watching as
droplets of rain splash on my wristwatch.
the torrent of rain clears my brain and my
spirit
as
a long line of blue lightning splits
the night sky.
I smile inside, remembering that
someone once said, "I'd rather be lucky than good," and I quickly
think, "I'd rather be lucky and good"
as tonight
as Bruckner sets the tone
as the hard
rain continues to fall
as another blue stark of lightning
explodes in the sky
I'm grateful that for the moment I'm
both.
CB
pg129, The Flash of Lightning…

 
Last edited:

roni

Over 5000 posts
[...] Anton Bruckner' Symphony No.3.
a fine work. it was dedicated to Richard Wagner.
Bruckner's success was never even close to Wagners or Brahms'. He was always in the second row. But I love his symphonies, which are very powerful. (the unfinished 9th is a sure bet.)

Gustav Mahler once claimed, Bruckner was "half genius, half retarded", meaning he was a genius in music but not savvy enough to sell his genius properly or even act successful in society.
I'm all for Bruckner.
 

number6horse

okyoutwopixiesoutyougo
Over 1000 posts
Saw a nice Gustav Mahler quote recently: "Tradition is to feed the fire, not worship the ashes."
 

Black Swan

Abord the Yorikke!
Over 1000 posts
This Thursday, I went to hear a live concert directed by Kent Nagano in Mtl.
It started with Wagner followed by Shoenberg and Shubert's Symphony no.8 , a symphony that was never finished and which I loved.
[This video is unavailable.]
 

Andreas

Over 100 posts
Unfortunately, I can't listen to the video above ('not available').
I like Chopin. The piece of music below, played by W.Szpilman at his home in Warsaw, is just wonderful.
You have to watch this video on You Tube. It's worth it.

 

Faramir

Over 100 posts
I've been listening to some classical, I always thought it was snob music, but then I listened to Beethoven and now I have all his symphonies (I think I need to kind of break out of Bee symphonies a bit, been listening probably far too much) I have a few by Fricsay, Karajan, Toscanini, Cluytens, Carlos Kleiber, Chailly, Furtwangler. I have a bit of Sibelius (Karajan) a bit of Brahms (Karajan again), a Dvorak 9th (Fricsay). I'm thinking about getting into some Bartok.

Well anyway, I've never had more goosebumps, and throat lumps, and tears in the eyes since listening to classical. Friscay's horns in Bee's 9th 3rd movement always get me welling up, it's almost like hearing Beethoven's voice somehow. And that funeral march in the Eroica usually has me in pieces. Great stuff.
 

BukFan Brad

Over 100 posts
I like Chopin. The piece of music below, played by W.Szpilman at his home in Warsaw, is just wonderful.
I love Chopin's 'Nocturnes'. Which then took me back to the Irish composer, Henry Field, who developed the Nocturne before Chopin perfected it.
 

BukFan Brad

Over 100 posts
a fine work. it was dedicated to Richard Wagner.
Bruckner's success was never even close to Wagners or Brahms'. He was always in the second row. But I love his symphonies, which are very powerful. (the unfinished 9th is a sure bet.)

Gustav Mahler once claimed, Bruckner was "half genius, half retarded", meaning he was a genius in music but not savvy enough to sell his genius properly or even act successful in society.
I'm all for Bruckner.
In the writing world, W. H. Davies (the tramp poet) once wrote:

“This man has talent, that man genius
And here's the strange and cruel difference:
Talent gives pence and his reward is gold,
Genius gives gold and gets no more than pence.”

Sounds like Bruckner was the genius then.
 

Black Swan

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Over 1000 posts
Nagano was the director in the Frank Zappa doc 'Eat That Question', when Zappa's music is being played by a symphonic orchestra. If I remember well, Zappa had hired and paid the orchestra himself for the experience. If was great!
Young Nagano then, spectacular!
 

Black Swan

Abord the Yorikke!
Over 1000 posts
Last night's entire program at the OSM. Started with Ravel, then Rachmaninov and ended with Rimski-Korsakov.
Shéhérazade was the theme, the girl who tamed the murderous king by telling him stories for a 1000 and one nights, the Arabian Nights.
I was thinking of Bukowski listening to his favourite pieces on the radio and tried to imagine all the funky people coming in and out of his life while the orchestra played.
 

d gray

tried to do his best but could not
Founding member
Over 1000 posts
psychology of "concert coughing"

when i listen to live classical music i'm always struck by the amount of unrepressed and obnoxious coughing especially during the quiet parts so i googled it and some found articles about it.

http://www.independent.co.uk/arts-entertainment/classical/news/cacophony-of-sound-people-cough-on-purpose-during-classical-concerts-research-finds-8471735.html

http://www.limelightmagazine.com.au/Article/331783,do-classical-audiences-cough-on-purpose.aspx

and here's audio of keith jarrett stopping a concert - because of the coughing - to talk to the audience about it. doesn't go well...

 
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