What are you listening to? The world really needs to know. #7 (1 Viewer)

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LOL welp that one part is rad brah for sho but the rest sounds like my dog Fred playin one of them steel drums that the AFricans play at the farmers market! LOL! taht one dude in the board shorts though is way intense brah/ thats rad as hell. i bet he ate like 20 mushrooms and is trippin balls all the time LOL! I gotta go to belgium man it seems off the hook/
 

mjp

Founding member
That seems like an appropriate chill response to that.

Everyone thinks they can do dub. They think it's easy. Like writing a simple poem, or saying a profound thing in a simple way. ;)
 

d gray

tried to do his best but could not
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i had to google that.

i thought you were talking about his hairstyle...
 
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mjp

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Ha - yeah, sorry, that was a little esoteric. Kustom was an amp maker famous for their tuck and roll vinyl coverings.

Untitled-1.jpg


On a good day Kustom amps sounded like a big box full of hammers rattling around in the back of a pickup truck. On a bad day, like a big box full of broken hammers rattling around in the back of a pickup truck. Just a really lifeless and awful amp.

I don't know how he played through them.
 
On a good day Kustom amps sounded like a big box full of hammers rattling around in the back of a pickup truck. On a bad day, like a big box full of broken hammers rattling around in the back of a pickup truck. Just a really lifeless and awful amp.
Perhaps the guitar amps, but I subbed in last minute on a gig about 15-20 years ago and only had my bass. I plugged into a dirty and beat-up house Kustom bass rig (or maybe one of the other band's bass rig) and while it didn't make me want to get one for myself, it wasn't a train wreck. I remember musing about pushing it over on its side to see if it would bounce back to upright. Like a Michelin Man with several pounds of magnets and paper cones for organs.
 

mjp

Founding member
I don't know about their bass amps. It seemed, in the 70s anyway, that the only reason anyone ever bought one was for the novelty of the car seat finish. I remember playing through one for a few minutes once at a guitar shop and my friend and I just looked at each other and laughed. But then we were Marshall fans, so we were biased. And we were idiotic teenage pricks too, I should add. But I never heard anything from one of them that made me think, "Well there's a viable thing..."
 

mjp

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We (Boom Shaka) opened for her at the music Machine in West L.A. in December of 1988. Always thought she was under-appreciated.
 

Black Swan

Abord the Yorikke!
They loved her at the Van Folk Fest where I worked security throughout the eighties. Right after she played in Montreal where my friends caught her show.
 

Bukfan

"The law is wrong; I am right"
I´m listening to the album, "Shooting Star", by Danish Natasja. It's a reggae album she made in Jamaica where she was very popular. Here's "Jamaica Too Nice" from the album.


The most popular song from the album is "Calabria":


Full album:

 
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Johannes

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I recently read something about this band somewhere, remembered the name and looked them up on Youtube. Obviously they were a popular club band in the Hollywood scene of the 80's?

Seem to be almost forgotten today regarding their clicks on Youtube.

Does anyone of you know them?

 

mjp

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a popular club band in the Hollywood scene of the 80's...
Well, without listening to that, I can tell you that there were a thousand "popular" club bands in Hollywood in the 80s, and the majority of them were all exactly the same, like I imagine this one is. You know, just by the freeze frame here, which I'd wager is more than enough to judge them on. The 80s on the strip were dark days indeed. Though I know a lot of people remember them fondly as the greatest time in their lives.
 

Johannes

Founding member
That's true. To my untrained eye they always look like 1000 versions of Mötley Crüe.

I think with many people the fondness also (or even mostly) comes from the partying in this time and place?
Life must have been pretty wild in those days, from what I've read.

PS: Won't you listen to it at all? :D
 
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mjp

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Won't you listen to it at all?
I could, but I already know what I'll hear.

Okay, I'll listen to (some of) it.

. . .

What a surprise, a human poodle in a tank top twiddling on a superstrat through a Phase 90, a flanger ("just like Eddie, bro!") and idiotically scooped mids, a coked-up shrieking twat shrieking and twatting, a bass player going DUM DUM DUM DUM DUM DUM DUM DUM DUM DUM DUM DUM DUM DUM DUM DUM on a single note and a general air of unoriginality, painfully dull cock posing, horror and misery.

So yeah, just what I knew it would be by looking at them. I mean, that's the point of looking a certain way for most people. So everyone who sees you will know who you are without a lot of uncomfortable explanation. In that way they were successful.

And I should probably mention, so you don't think I'm just a hater, that when Van Halen came through St. Paul for the first time in 1978 (opening for Montrose and Journey), I was right there in the front row. Because I'd never heard anything like that record, and I wanted to see if they really sounded like that with my own ears and eyes. I even went to the trouble of getting backstage before the show to look at Eddie's setup, which was three 100 watt Marshall amps turned all the way up and the aforementioned phase 90 and flanger, duct taped to a little piece of plywood.

To come up with the sound they came up with was inventive and exciting. Everyone else who came after, copying the sound as exactly as they could, were just sad clowns. Including Van Halen themselves, who never did anything new after that first record.
 

Johannes

Founding member
painfully dull cock posing

Story of my life.

---

Seeing Van Halen in 78 must have been incredible, tho.

In your opinion, did anything good come out of the Hollywood-scene of the 80's at all? How about Guns 'N Roses?
 

mjp

Founding member
Guns 'N Roses were cool for a minute, but they could have just as easily come from 1974 as 1984. The problem, as I saw it (and I was admittedly an outsider), was there was no rock and roll underground here in Los Angeles in the 80s. I left Minneapolis that was nothing but underground (Husker Du, Replacements, and a hundred other bands), and I got here and felt like I was dropped into a game show where everyone was desperate to win the showcase showdown.

The underground that did exist in town was like dirgey, mopey, undertaker doom crap. The real underground was in the beach cities and to a lesser extent, Orange County. Punk bands were playing in people's yards and abandoned skate parks. Not my scene (I was too old at 24, and spent my time mainly in the reggae clubs), but you could feel that they were alive and making a go of it.
 
A couple of my old childhood favourites, just a boy wearing a pair of giant headphones rummaging through my step-father's records and gingerly lowering the needle onto the cool looking stuff.

Wishbone Ash - The King Will Come


Wishbone Ash - Blowin' Free
 
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