What are you listening to? The world really needs to know. #5 (1 Viewer)

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Skygazer

And in the end...
If you ever get a chance to hear these guys live - do.
But can anyone explain the referance to codeine?
Possibly Erik the friend has the Codeine on standby, 'cos she'll need it when she's done cryin' an' wailin' because:
a) he said "what hairdo?"
b) agreed that her bum did look big in that dress
c) refused to give up custody of the tv remote

Think this is more the real answer: quote from Jason Isbell, singer/songwriter of the above track,the Dirty Beggars covered.

Isbell’s work is filled with references to prescription drugs — one of his finest songs, a kind of fiddle-strewn anti-waltz, is titled “Codeine” — and when I asked him later why this is, he hesitated for a minute. “I think I just love the sound those words make,” he said. “Prescription drugs have never been seductive to me, but they put some realism in a song. More people are addicted to legal drugs than illegal ones.”
Jason Isbell, a songwriter and former member of the Drive-By Truckers.
By DWIGHT GARNER
Published: May 31, 2013

New York Times Magazine, Jason Isbell, unloaded.
 
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hoochmonkey9

Art should be its own hammer.
Reaper Crew
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Miles Davis, gone 22 years today. I remember that day well, it was also a Saturday. I had come home from a relay race from here to Lunenburg, about 100 kms. I was stiff and just wanted to have a few beers and read and listen to music and go to bed. The phone was ringing in my apartment when I got home. It was my mother calling to tell me that Miles Davis had died. Moms were the internet back in 1991.

I did have the beers and listen to music, but I went to bed a lot later than planned.

Ah, Miles.

 

PhillyDave

“The essential doesn't change.” Beckett
Some Vintage Punk:

I saw Keith Richards and the Expensive Winos at an old venue here in the Philly area called the Tower Theater in '93(?). They opened with "Somethin Else". I was blown away. They did the semi-obscure "Between the Buttons" gem "Connections":
 

hoochmonkey9

Art should be its own hammer.
Reaper Crew
Moderator
Founding member
misheard lyric mayhem!

So, I've had a copy of Fun House since high school, the mid '80s. I've always thought the line from Loose, "I'll stick it deep inside" was "I'm stupid deep inside." Yesterday I decided to look at the lyric sheet.

Doh. They all say Doh.

And what's worse, I've sung that song in a couple of my shortlived bands.(They were all short lived, most not making it out of the basement.) It was probably with Shiloh or Tim Karurinsky, or both. But in my defense, I had a taped pirated copy of the album at that point, so I couldn't consult the lyric sheet, I transcribed it.

Stupid deep inside, indeed.

Anyway...

[This video is unavailable.]
 

mjp

Founding member
There's a lyric sheet?

Stick it deep inside gives it a slightly different meaning than what you were singing, doesn't it.

So now you know he's screaming the wall! on down on the street, right? I only learned that one when I read something Ron Asheton said in the Detroit Rock City book.
 

PhillyDave

“The essential doesn't change.” Beckett
Ponder: Sam Baker is reminiscent of Willie Vlautin from the band Richmond Fontaine. "High County" He's also an excellent novelist.
 

PhillyDave

“The essential doesn't change.” Beckett
Heard this the other day and thought "I'm gonna have a good day. I think luck is on my side." and i did.
 

Skygazer

And in the end...
Apparently one of the Hunter S Thompson favourite tracks; so another reason to love him.
Re-reading The Great Shark Hunt this week and he says he started writing Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas in the Ramada Hotel in LA, must have been 1970 or 1971, the hotel is opposite the Santa Anita Racetrack - isn't that one of the tracks CB went to?

angry red, passion blue, but mostly... shades of gree-een
 
Ignore the first 3 minutes, and minimize the window so you don't have to see that damn hippie shit. Just listen to the jam and how the rhythm section forces this to where it goes...


Here's one where you don't have to scroll 3 minutes in:


I'm not sure how to explain this, but this jam completely describes how my mind works.
 
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what are you on Mr. JM? :p
It's not like that. I first got into the Dead in '81 in my first year of college. I saw ~20 shows from '82-'85. But while I had amassed a good number of boot tapes, I had only one from '72. It wasn't until this year that I discovered '72 versions of Playing in the Band. In '73-'74, those jams got more extended, to the point of excess. The '72 versions are more to the point and the jams are more focused. It only occurred to me recently that the unconventional grounding of the rhythm section with Jerry's searching over the top was exactly the sound I've been trying to find in my mind. So, nothing to see here, really. Unless you are concerned with how my brain works.

I would add that a good 70% of the Dead is unlistenable to me. It's that other 30% that reaches heights no band can replicate.
 

mjp

Founding member
minimize the window so you don't have to see that damn hippie shit.
Then mute your speakers so you don't have to hear it.
:aerb:

You have more patience than I do to endure a 70/30 split. Though I do understand, because I've seen live Clash shows that approach that ratio - they tended to be either the best band you'd ever seen in your life or the worst, depending on the night - but I don't know that I could live with a ratio like that on records. I'd never go to a live show if the records were 70/30.

But if a band has a long career, it's easy to dip into that territory. Where the bad outweighs the good. It's a funny thing. To produce consistently great music over a period of more than a few years is a rare and marvelous thing. When it happens. Which is almost never. I can count the people who've I think have done it on the fingers of one hand (no Jerry Garcia joke intended).
 
No band, musician, or composer that I can think of nailed it consistently for any extended period of time. Perhaps the most recent example would be Beethoven and before that, Mozart. I don't care much for Mozart's somewhat fluffy, academic style, but it's hard to find a bad bit in the whole lot. Moreso than anything else in life, in music, I find the reward in risk-taking. So liking 30% of a band's output (and really finding true gems in only about 30% of that 30%) is part of the allure. The concept of great has no context without the concept of horrible, and music is the most accessible example of that to me.
 
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