What are you listening to? The world really needs to know. #5

Johannes

Founding member
This one comes right out of the hipster generation which might annoy you, but don't you think that it has a wonderful trippy feeling to it?

 

PhillyDave

“The essential doesn't change.” Beckett
Heard this on the way to work today and thought, "I'm gonna have a good day today. I think luck is on my side." So far so good. If i keep posting tunes like this one would think I'm a hard rocker/metalhead, not that there's anyhting wrong w/ that.

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The Airplane on The Smothers' Brothers, 1968. What's most cool about this is the brief excursion into polyrhythm (syncopated 12 over 4 @ 1:29-1:35). Marty Balin looks back as if to say WTF, while Grace sports a big ole gleeful smile. No doubt the Airplane had learned a trick or two from the good ole Grateful Dead. Grace, for all her political correctness, appears in black face. Because nobody said no.


Before the Beatles, there was the Airplane:

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Thanks to Bukfan for reminding me about my Airplane exclusion from my thread that degenerated into a '70 movie review.
 
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Skygazer

And in the end...
Jack Bruce and er... the other two members of Cream, since the topic has come up in another thread:). PS the audience really put me off in this. Wish the camera just stayed on the band.
 

Ponder

"So fuck Doubleday Doran"
RIP
This one comes right out of the hipster generation which might annoy you, but don't you think that it has a wonderful trippy feeling.
Not bad at all, Johannes.

It has probably nothing to do with it but my mind goes back to Cocteau Twins, or a project Frazer later has been involved and a long conversation in the Streets of Andernach in front of a restaurant. ;)
 
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Skygazer

And in the end...
Not bad at all, Johannes.

It has probably nothing to do with it but my mind goes back to Cocteau Twins, or a project Frazer later has been involved and a long conversation in the Streets of Andernach in front of a restaurant. ;)

Hey Ponder, nice to see you liked the Cocteau Twins.They were from Stirlingshire too, but their town was Grangemouth (mine - Linlithgow), only 10 mins away. Here they are as This Mortal Coil again.
 

PhillyDave

“The essential doesn't change.” Beckett
I forgot Chuck Berry's birthday last week. Shame on me. But then again, as Keith Richards said, Chuck hasn't done anything good since the 60's. I'd say the "Hail Hail Rock n' Roll" movie is the exception. But I digress.

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PhillyDave

“The essential doesn't change.” Beckett
My friend's band The Really Cooks is going to be playing as Dr Teeth and the Electric Mayhem for their Halloween show. They posted this Chopin performance on fb:

 

Erik

If u don't know the poetry u don't know Bukowski
Founding member
There are so many reggae songs that are basic, simple, close to primitive, almost banal, but they still have something I like. To put it in Bukowskian terms: They don't try. They just enjoy - whatever flow they manage to get going.

This one has some faint, a bit off tune, whistling in the background that probobly just happened. You can barely hear it. Its barely there. But it makes the song for me. The fact that its barely audible just adds to my fascination. Was it somebody in the studio just whistling along? Maybe the producer. I love the no nonsense, a bit stumbling, restraint of reggae songs like this.
 

mjp

Founding member
There might have been "accidental" sounds on the Silvertones records they made with Scratch Perry, but I don't think this is one of those. Since they were a harmony group I suspect the whistling was an intentional thing by one of them.

It is very typical and unremarkable, but I know what you mean about some songs or singers or groups who come at you that way yet somehow sneak in on a whole other level. Burning Spear is a great example of that. I swear I used to have a Burning Spear LP that I don't think used more than two chords on the whole damn record.

Yet those Winston Rodney vocals, and the trancelike effect of the repeating chords - I don't know man. It's either pure shit or it's pure genius. I tend to believe the latter. Making simple music is as difficult as writing simple poetry, and it takes a lot of skill and talent to do either one well.

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Erik

If u don't know the poetry u don't know Bukowski
Founding member
There might have been "accidental" sounds on the Silvertones records they made with Scratch Perry, but I don't think this is one of those. Since they were a harmony group I suspect the whistling was an intentional thing by one of them.
Hmmm, after a couple more listens I'm beginning to think its not whistling at all but some sort of dub-effect. Thats Scratch Perry for ya.
I liked it better when I thought it was good old whistling though.
Damn. I listened it to death.
;-)
 

mjp

Founding member
I don't think it's Scratch since it's on a Studio One label. I'm thinking any Scratch records with the Silvertones would have been on Upsetter (or one of Perry's other 20 or 30 labels).

Of course Scratch did work for Studio One at the beginning of his career as a producer, so there are Studio One Perry records...just to add to the general confusion where Jamaican singles are concerned.

What I was saying is that Silvertones track didn't sound like a Scratch production to me. And I can't really listen to it loud enough here on my tiny work computer speakers to get a handle on the whistling sound...
 

PhillyDave

“The essential doesn't change.” Beckett
The above song is really good but I got the Isaacs song Scratch & Keith are doing wrong. Apparently it's this one, "Love Is Overdue":

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Nice tune and strong vocal. A re-harm/adaptation of Autumn Leaves; y'know, in case it sounds familiar.

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Excuse the "synched" video. It's way off base. Nevertheless, the music can speak for itself.
 
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I have to add a comment on Eva Cassidy, to whom I linked a viddy in my last post. She wasn't groundbreaking and she didn't create anything new for the musical tradition. She was a very shy young woman who did a few gigs in her short lifetime and she was apparently reluctant to be in the spotlight. What she did do was to take a few songs that had been played countless times and nail them to the point that she made them her own. No small feat. She passed away at the age of 33 in 1996. I rarely get sappy on this forum, but she needs to be remembered for her ability to sing crystalline notes to a fluid guitar line. We need more musicians like Eva Cassidy. Her vocal control was astonishing.

Here's a cheezy song, done more times than it ever should have been, that Eva nails. I cry whenever I hear it:

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Black Swan

Abord the Yorikke!
Nice tune and strong vocal. A re-harm/adaptation of Autumn Leaves; y'know, in case it sounds familiar.

Funny, I only discovered Eva Cassidy a few days ago, when I was listening to every version of "Autumn Leaves" I could find.
Very pure voice.

My favorite is still this one.

 

Erik

If u don't know the poetry u don't know Bukowski
Founding member
Interesting how easily reggae blends with jazz.
Reggae never had an internationally acclaimed singeress...yet.

 
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