What are you listening to? The world really needs to know. Volume 8

I was heavily dosed on The Carpenters in the 70s. My parents had ALL of their albums on 8-track.

Re Karen Carpenter: Something indescribable about her voice to me, but I'll try:

"Very high fidelity. Smokey and sultry with an always present tang of melancholy."

Not sure that captures her sound, but it's a start. Any other thoughts?
 
The aggressive repetitiveness in this album is amazing on some songs like this one. It can be a bit of drag on others, though. Interesting album overall. More thematic than anything else really. Felt like I was watching a scene from a David Lynch movie the whole time, but without the scene. I should probably listen to it a second time for it to really sink in, if I can find another couple of spare, noiseless hours of my life to do it.


 

d gray

tried to do his best but could not
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the max machine is still going strong! they remind me a bit of zappa except they're good...

 
Giving this another listen. Seriouly can't get enough of this album. Been trying to get New Rose nailed down on the guitar lately, too.

 

mjp

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Seems we're spending time in the 1970s, so here's something we don't hear around here very often. Timbales and congas!

Santana was the first music I heard on the radio with this kind of percussion and syncopation. Well, it was probably the only music on the radio with percussion like that. It made me want to listen to reggae, but it hadn't been invented yet so I had to wait.

Seeing Clapton playing with Lennon and Keef there reminded me that Santana is one of the only fiddly guitar deities I can listen to and smile.





Percussion smackdown! And that Mexican guitar player is tripping on acid!

 

d gray

tried to do his best but could not
Founding member
Over 1000 posts
someone said this in the comments -

"The face of a man trying so hard for his guitar not to become a snake."
 

d gray

tried to do his best but could not
Founding member
Over 1000 posts
wow i had not heard that santana acid woodstock story before. HE said he thought his
guitar neck was a snake and he was trying to stop it from bending around while he played.

he said when he arrived he thought he had about 12 hours till they went on so he took it
thinking he'd be cool by then. not long after he took it someone said "you gotta go
on now or you're not playing."

he said he prayed to god just to play in tune and get him through it.

it worked. he was savage! so was the whole band.
 

mjp

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It's funny too that their first record wasn't even out yet when they played Woodstock. I don't remember whether it was Bill Graham or Clive Davis who got them onto the bill, but someone with a lot of clout made a phone call.
 
"When I listen to old music, it's one of the few times... when I actually have a kind of a love for humanity. You hear the best part of the soul of the common people, you know. It's their way of the expressing their connection to eternity of whatever you want to call it. Modern music doesn't have that. It's a calamitous loss that people can't express themselves that way anymore."
 
I was adamant to giving new Pixies a shot, seeing as how many people say they're not as good as they were. However, I've listened to a couple of their new songs and they are still quite good. Still one of my favorite bands, and one that really got me deeply into music.

 
Anne Patricia Briggs (born 29 September 1944) is an English folk singer. Although she travelled widely in the 1960s and early 1970s, appearing at folk clubs and venues in England and Ireland, she never aspired to commercial success or to achieve widespread public acknowledgment of her music. However, she was an influential figure in the English folk music revival, being a source of songs and musical inspiration for others such as A. L. Lloyd, Bert Jansch, Jimmy Page, The Watersons, June Tabor, Sandy Denny, Richard Thompson and Maddy Prior.


 
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